Comfort and Joy – Meeting Mr. Bunny

If you are among the many Hobbledehoy who love Bill Forsyth’s Local Hero and Gregory’ Girl, we’d love to introduce you to a lesser-known classic from the Scot director, Comfort and Joy. Here’s a wee clip with Bill Patterson (as radio DJ Dicky Bird) and Clare Grogan, and Alex Norton.

Comfort and Joy is about a war between two Italian families, the Bernardis and the Rossis, over whose ice cream vans can sell where in Glasgow. It’s also about finding meaning in life.

Oh, and that cool music soundtrack with the vibes? Mark Knofler. -who also wrote the original music for Local Hero.

There was a real “Ice Cream War” in Glasgow in 1984, and it led to murders within the city. It was really a drug-land turf war by gangs who used ice cream vans as a front. Writers Douglas Skelton and Lisa Brownlie cover the story in their 1992 book “Frightener”. The deaths of van-driver Andrew Boyle (who had resisted being involved in drug dealing) and his family happened in April 1984, four months before “Comfort and Joy” was released, and as star Bill Paterson acknowledges, this had an impact on the film’s reception: “It wasn’t a great time to launch a light-hearted look at the ice-cream business in Glasgow.

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Bill Forsyth’s “Comfort and Joy” (1984) remains a holiday gem

Bill Forsyth’s slice of Glasgow noir never received the praise showered upon its predecessors Local Hero and Gregory’s Girl. The bonus interviews included on this disc hint at the reasons why: Forsyth admits that his script could have been tightened up, and Claire Grogan suggests that the film’s payoff doesn’t feel like a proper ending.

Comfort and Joy is still a treat, though, its dry humour a return to the style of Forsyth’s zero-budget debut. Bill Paterson’s Alan “Dickie” Bird is a Partridgesque local radio DJ whose life starts to unravel when his kleptomaniac girlfriend leaves him. Buying a 99 from an ice cream van he’s chased because he fancies the serving girl (Grogan) unwittingly involves him in a turf war between rival Italian ice cream vendors. The news items we hear on Bird’s car radio are full of African coups and Middle Eastern peace negotiations, foreshadowing his decision to act as a mediator between the two firms.

Cinematographer Chris Menges gives the mean streets of Glasgow a warm, twinkly glow, despite the city’s northern latitude limiting the number of exterior shots. The visual jokes are brilliant: we see that Bird’s problems really begin when he, Alice-like, follows a Mr Bunny ice cream van into a dark tunnel. Alex Norton’s Trevor, reeling from a baseball bat attack on his van, turns out to be relatively unharmed: the blood pouring down his face is actually raspberry sauce. Bird’s prized BMW literally disintegrates as the film unwinds, the victim of bird shit, ice cream and physical violence. As things escalate, he uses his early morning radio show to broadcast coded messages to the warring tribes, prompting boss Rikki Fulton to refer him to eccentric psychiatrist Arnold Brown.

Forsyth elicits predictably winning performances from his large cast, including a convincingly Glaswegian-sounding Patrick Malahide as Bird’s best friend, and Roberto Bernardi as the charismatic “Mr McCool”.

Robert Buchanan has a blink-or-miss-it cameo, and even Claire Grogan’s atrocious Italian accent doesn’t derail proceedings. This restored print looks and sounds excellent; Mark Knopfler’s moody soundtrack adding much to the atmosphere. And, as already noted, the interviews with Forsyth, Paterson and Grogan are a delight, revealing that the idea for the plot was suggested to the director by a young Peter Capaldi.

Source: DVD: Comfort and Joy | The Arts Desk

A Faraway Back of Beyond Place

A musical drama about a young musician’s quest to find the truth about her family. The drama stars much loved iconic Scots actor Bill Paterson and, in her first appearance in a radio drama, the award winning folk musician Karine Polwart.

As BBC Radio 2 Folk Singer Of The Year 2018, Karine Polwart is a multi-award-winning Scottish songwriter and musician, as well as a theatre maker, storyteller, spoken-word performer and published essayist. Her songs combine folk influences and myth with themes as diverse as “Donald Trump’s corporate megalomania”, Charles Darwin’s family life and the complexities of modern parenthood. She sings traditional songs too and writes to commission for theatre, animation and thematic collaborative projects. Karine is six-times winner at the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards, including twice for Best Original Song.

Cast:

Tommy … Bill Paterson
Lucy … Karine Polwart

Listen at: BBC Radio 4 – A Faraway Back of Beyond Place