Give us a tune “Ca’ the Yowes”

1789 lyrics Robert Burns


Ca’ the yowes to the knowes,
Ca’ them where the heather grows
Ca’ them where the burnie rows,
My bonie dearie.

Hark! the mavis’ evening sang
Sounding Cluden’s woods amang,
Then a-fauldin let us gang,
My bonie dearie.

We’ll gae down by Cluden side,
Thro’ the hazels spreading wide,
O’er the waves that sweetly glide
To the moon sae clearly.

Fair and lovely as thou art,
Thou hast stown my very heart;
I can die—but canna part,
My bonie dearie.

Ca’ the yowes to the knowes,
Ca’ them where the heather grows
Ca’ them where the burnie rows,
My bonie dearie.

Advertisements

‘More young people should learn to love Auld Lang Syne’

Auld Lang Syne remains one of Robert Burns' best-known works

The next generation could let old anthems be forgotten, according to new research which show Auld Lang Syne is not a New Year hit with younger listeners.

Online streaming data has shown that the traditional ballad sung to ring in the New Year is losing popularity, with mainly older generations still listening. The Scottish song, based on a poem by Robert Burns, was the most-played track between 11.55pm on New Year’s Eve 2017 and 12.05am on January 1 this year, according to streaming service Deezer. However, the hymn to the passing of the old year may be a tradition that is lost on a new generation, with 18 to 25-year-old listeners making up only 5% of those streaming on New Year. More than half of all Auld Lang Syne streams are from listeners aged over 45.

Deezer editor Adam Read said: “This New Year’s Eve, we’re encouraging more young people to embrace the festive tradition of singing Auld Lang Syne.” The song remains popular in Scotland, with Glasgow the location of the most streams. This is followed by Farnham in Surrey, with Aberdeen, Barry and Great Yarmouth rounding off the top five. Burns first penned the poem in 1788, claiming to have collected the verse from a more ancient Scots song. Put to a traditional folk tune, it became a Scottish custom to sing the song, which was spread across the world through emigration from the British Isles.

Source THE SCOTSMAN: ‘More young people should learn to love Auld Lang Syne’

Musician Mairi is breathing new life into Auld Lang Syne 

he story of Scotland’s most famous song and the life of one of its most celebrated musicians are coming to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

Mairi Campbell: Auld Lang Syne is the story of Scotland’s most famous song and the life of one of the nation’s most celebrated musicians. Mairi follows her hugely successful solo theatre show Pulse bringing audiences on a new adventure taking in singing for US President Bill Clinton, a starring role in Sex and the City and a reinterpretation of the Robert Burns classic that changed her life.

Blending storytelling, dance and new music composed in collaboration with David Gray, Mairi Campbell: Auld Lang Syne explores the meaning of one of the world’s most performed songs through the lens of Mairi’s rich experience.

Delivered with her trademark wit, gentle charm and unparalleled musical ability the sequel to five star show Pulse is an unforgettable hour in the company of one of Scotland’s leading artists.

With live music, animation and a singalong, this funny and heartfelt show resonates with wider universal truths.

Mairi Campbell: Auld Lang Syne is a continuation of Mairi’s exploration of multi artform performance and this collaboration is co-devised directed and directed by Kath Burlinson, featuring a collection of tracks composed with musician David Gray with input from musician David Francis and featuring sculpture from sound artist Tim Vincent Smith and animation from Claire Lamond. Mairi Campbell: Auld Lang Syne is part of the 2018 Made in Scotland Showcase.

Source: Musician Mairi is breathing new life into Auld Lang Syne – Scottish Field

The Death and Resurrection of Robert Burns – BBC Radio Scotland

Keara Murphy explores the strange afterlife of Robert Burns.

Keara Murphy explores the strange afterlife of Robert Burns who was not allowed to rest peacefully in his grave for long and whose afterlife was more eventful than you might think. Phrenologists, spiritualists and worthy admirers all wanted a piece of the post-mortem Burns – sometimes literally. He was disinterred twice, including his skull being taken for a midnight walk to a plasterer’s workshop in the cause of phrenology. Dr Megan Coyer of Glasgow University explains all, Professor David Price of Edinburgh University examines the plaster cast of the skull with us and poet Stuart Paterson contemplates the afterlife of Scotland’s bard with some verse of his own. Investigating Burn’s alleged afterlife in 1850s Yorkshire, People’s Historian Dan Gray introduces us to the Keighley Spiritualists and the terrible poems they claimed they’d channelled from Rabbie himself. Had he really taken up temperance and lost his Scots tongue in Yorkshire? Clearly you can’t keep a good poet down – because as a séance favourite he pops up all over the place. Join Keara to find out more about Burns beyond the grave.

Listen at: The Death and Resurrection of Robert Burns – BBC Radio Scotland