Helen McCrory: Life and Career of the Famous British Actress

by Akarsh Shekha

Helen McCrory is a famous British actress who has also been honoured with the Order of the British Empire (OBE). She has played some very famous roles such as Cherie Blair in The Queen (2006) and The Special Relationship (2010). Helen McCrory also played the role of Françoise in the film Charlotte Gray (2001). But she is definitely most famous for her role of Narcissa Malfoy in three Harry Potter movies. Aside from being a part of the global blockbuster franchise, Helen McCrory also played the role of Mama Jeanne in Martin Scorsese’s family film Hugo (2011). She has also made an appearance in a Bond film, playing the role of Clair Dowar Skyfall (2012). The prolific Helen McCrory also appeared as Polly Gray in Peaky Blinders (2013–present), Emma Banville in Fearless (2017) and Kathryn Villiers in MotherFatherSon (2019). She also played the role of Madame Kali/Evelyn Poole in Showtime’s supernatural drama, Penny Dreadful. Let’s find out more about this incredible actress

When was Helen McCrory born?
Helen McCrory was born on August 17th, 1968 in Paddington in England, UK. She was born to Welsh mother Ann Morgans and Scottish father Iain McCrory. The couple married in 1974 and had three children, with Helen McCrory being the eldest.

Where did Helen McCrory study?
Helen McCrory studied at Queenswood School near Hatfield, Hertfordshire. After that, she took a gap year and lived in Italy. Once she came back to Britain, she started her acting course at London’s Drama Centre.

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Helen McCrory: Peaky Blinders actress dies aged 52, husband Damian Lewis says

The star, who has died of cancer, was a “beautiful and mighty woman”, her husband Damian Lewis said.

Actress Helen McCrory, known for her roles in Peaky Blinders and three Harry Potter films, has died of cancer at the age of 52, her husband, the actor Damian Lewis, announced.

He said he was “heartbroken”, and that she was a “beautiful and mighty woman”.

He wrote“She blazed so brightly. Go now, Little One, into the air, and thank you.”

Harry Potter author JK Rowling led the tributes, writing that it was “simply heartbreaking news”.

McCrory was also known for her long and acclaimed career on stage, and the National Theatre’s artistic director Rufus Norris said she was “unquestionably one of the great actors of her generation”. [ . . . ]

Continue at BBC: Helen McCrory: Peaky Blinders actress dies aged 52, husband Damian Lewis says

Obituary: Dr Marc Ellington, US-born folk singer who joined British Establishment

Dr Marc Ellington, DL, Baron of Towie Barclay. Born: December 16 1945 in Boston, Massachusetts, United States. Died: February 17 2021, aged 75

There’s a photo in the Great Hall in Towie Barclay Castle of two men sharing a real belly laugh –one is a bearded and pony-tailed former folk singer called Marc Ellington, the other is a kilted Duke of Rothesay, better known as HRH Prince Charles. The photo clearly shows two things – firstly, a quite genuine friendship between the two men, and secondly, the fact that Marc Ellington knew everybody.

He was quite shameless when it came to name-dropping, which could be a little disorientating, “Bob” could be a reference to the local doctor in Turriff or Dylan or Marley. He had genuinely played alongside a dazzling array of musical greats, fully half of whom had slept on the floor of his flat at some stage. His daughters Kirstie and Iona once found themselves on a family holiday in Mustique having a singsong with a slim, pale man with mismatched eyes who, according to them, “wasn’t very good”. Thankfully nobody relayed that back to David Bowie.

The Ellington family home, Towie Barclay Castle, near Turriff in Aberdeenshire, is a stunning 16th-century tower house that Marc and wife Karen, an award-winning landscaper and garden designer, bought as a ruin in the late 1960s for a few thousand pounds, then spent years painstakingly rebuilding. The project was funded entirely through Marc’s musical career and kept on track by Karen’s rigorous attention to detail. Their outstanding restoration was given a Saltire Award in 1973.

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John le Carré obituary

Writer whose spy novels chronicle how people’s lives play out in the corrupt setting of the cold war era and beyond

John le Carré, who has died aged 89 of pneumonia, raised the spy novel to a new level of seriousness and respect.

He was in his late 20s when he began to write fiction – in longhand, in small red pocket notebooks, on his daily train journey between his home in Buckinghamshire and his day job with MI5, the counter-intelligence service, in London. After the publication of two neatly crafted novels, Call for the Dead (1961) and A Murder of Quality (1962), which received measured reviews and modest sales, he hit the big time with The Spy Who Came in from the Cold  [ . . . ]

Continue at THE GUARDIAN: John le Carré obituary