The Archers new star Alison Steadman: Radio 4 show is no “middle class bubble”

The new star of the BBC Radio 4 soap also looks back at her trailblazing career, and how the TV industry has changed since the 1970s

Alison Steadman is explaining why she loves being on the radio. “I haven’t got the nose to do Virginia Woolf on telly,” she says, “but I can be her on the radio. I can be Princess Di, even Margaret Thatcher. I can be anyone.”

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End of the Fucking World Review 

“The End of the F***cking World” is a near-perfect Netflix binge and, in all likelihood, an intolerable traditional television experience. Through three episodes, the adaptation of Charles Forsman’s comic book series comes across as a pointless odyssey copping themes and plot points from other, better stories: That “Bonnie & Clyde” is directly referenced does little to pique interest in the lead characters, James and Alyssa, as they embark on an unprompted road trip-turned-crime spree across England.But then it clicks: A relatively late turn — over an hour into the two-and-a-half-hour series — provides a much-needed sense of purpose, and suddenly “The End of the F***ing World” becomes a darkly compelling journey of self-discovery and adolescent confusion. James develops into more than a disturbed wannabe serial killer; he’s a confused kid trying to cope with pain the only way he knows how. Alyssa isn’t an uncaring, self-destructive disruptor, but a child acting out to get the attention she actually needs.

That their relatable motivations comes out at the same time the two alienated and alienating leads start acting a bit nicer to one another may lead to a misunderstanding: The first half(-ish) of “The End of the Fucking World” (we’re done bleeping the name, thank you) isn’t frustrating because the characters are unlikable; it’s difficult because everything feels forced. The world turns bleak to accommodate their own bleakness; bad people lurk around every corner; darkness is definitely defeating the light.

Once we understand a bit more about their decision-making, the show opens up and starts to flow in a more natural manner. It’s fascinating, fresh, and exposes the viewer to surprising emotional depths. The ending is almost antithetical to the beginning, in that it feels authentic and inevitable while the beginning feels artificial and quirked up. (Before you understand where the story is going, so many early scenes feel designed solely to provoke, rather than inform and drive the story.)

And that ending is already a point of controversy. The series aired in October 2017 across the pond (on Channel 4 in the U.K.), and it’s stirring up discussion in the States now that “The End of the Fucking World” is popping up in Netflix queues. Below, we’ll dig into the events leading up to a surprising, satisfying finale, but if you’re not there yet, just know this:

“The End of the Fucking World” is worth sticking with (unless you’re utterly intolerant of animal abuse, which is a persistent theme). Even if you’re not immediately engrossed — and who knows, you very well could be — keep going to discover what’s got everyone talking. Then come back and keep reading [ . . . ]

Continue reading at: End of the Fucking World Review (Netflix): Let’s Talk Endings—Spoilers | IndieWire

The End of the F***king World’s Alyssa May Be the Best Teen Heroine of 2018

Breakout star Jessica Barden digs into her surprising Netflix series, why she’s thrilled Alyssa stole that underwear, and what she hopes to see if there’s a second season.

Six years ago, Jessica Barden sauntered into a dance studio to audition for The End of the F***king World, a short film adapted from Charles Forsman’s graphic novel about two high-school oddballs who steal a car and get the hell out of their humdrum hometown. Barden was after the female lead, Alyssa, all outward confidence and bravado concealing a cache of confusion and vulnerability.

“I shaved my hair off the year before for another job, and I was in the process of growing it out. I had what I now lovingly refer to as a mullet,” Barden, now 25, tells Vanity Fair matter-of-factly by phone. Upon entering the room, she spotted a pole and broke out into impromptu dance in front of her potential employers. (“What else was I supposed to do? It felt very natural.“) She also shared an idea she’d been mulling for a movie, about a girl who grows up in a brothel and becomes a country music star. Of all the actresses director Jonathan Entwistle and producer Dominic Buchanan saw that day, Barden was the only to dance and discuss a feel-good movie involving prostitution during her audition.

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Why Simon Pegg Wants To Make TV Shows More Than Movies Now

Simon Pegg is planning to make more TV shows than movies and these are his reasons.

Simon Pegg is on a hot streak in his film career. He has supporting roles in both the Star Trek and Mission Impossible franchises, as well as a voice role in the popular Ice Age movies. Most recently, Pegg starred in Steven Spielberg’s hit Ready Player One. Things are going well for Pegg. Despite his silver screen success, the actor, comedian, and screenwriter, is planning to shift his attention towards television. Pegg explained his decision, saying:

The opportunities that television affords now are just super different. If we want to run a business, there is no money in independent cinema, unfortunately. I still want to make it and I still want to create it but the film side of Big Talk productions which made Shaun of the DeadHot FuzzPauland The World’s End really wasn’t the money-making side. It’s a really rickety world out there for filmmakers and there are no sort of mid-budget movies anymore. For financial reasons, really, television is such a fertile marketplace: that’s where it is at present.[ . . . ]

Read More at Source: Why Simon Pegg Wants To Make TV Shows More Than Movies Now