Stan & Ollie: Steve Coogan and John C Reilly star as Laurel and Hardy

Knowing me Alan Partridge, knowing you Stan Laurel. Aha!Steve Coogan has gone from playing the hapless Norfolk-based TV and radio host to playing one half of legendary comedy duo Laurel and Hardy in a new film.The first photo has been released of Coogan as Laurel alongside Guardians of the Galaxy actor John C Reilly, who plays Oliver Hardy in Stan & Ollie.The film, which follows the pair on their farewell tour, will close the BFI London Film Festival on 21 October.That will be its world premiere, ahead of its cinema release next January.

Laurel and Hardy earned their places as all-time comedy greats by starring in more than 100 films together from the 1920s to the 1950s.

Stan & Ollie is described as a “heart-warming story” that follows the pair on their “triumphant” final tour of UK and Ireland in 1953.

It has been penned by Jeff Pope, who wrote 2013’s Oscar-nominated Philomena with Coogan.

Director Jon S Baird said: “Stan & Ollie, at its heart, is a love story between old friends who just happen to be two of the most iconic comedic characters in Hollywood’s history.”

The film also will also star Nina Arianda and Shirley Henderson as Laurel and Hardy’s wives Ida and Lucille.

Source: Stan & Ollie: Steve Coogan and John C Reilly star as Laurel and Hardy – BBC News

The worst onscreen British accents

Acting is hard and acting with an accent is even harder. From Don Cheadle in the “Ocean’s franchise” to the third “Bridget Jones” movie, here are 11 actors who critics felt couldn’t nail the British accent.

If you watch a lot of movies and TV, you’ve probably noticed by now that some actors are not the best at doing accents that aren’t their own.

Slate even spoke to dialect coaches Bob and Claire Corff about why, and they helpfully explained that a lot of it has to do with how long actors train to do dialects in their respective countries. In other words, don’t hate the players, hate their abysmally accented games and giggle when a pro deconstructs them on YouTube for your amusement .

Here are 16 of the worst examples of onscreen attempts at British accents so far, according to critics.

Dick Van Dyke in “Mary Poppins” issued an apology for his accent.

Dick Van Dyke in
The film was still enjoyable to watch.

Long considered one of the worst British accents in all of cinematic history , Dick Van Dyke’s character Bert nonetheless wowed audiences with his engaging singing and dancing routines — even if his cockney accent was distractingly bad.

In 2017, Van Dyke was awarded a BAFTA — and he issued the following humorous public apology : “I appreciate this opportunity to apologize to the members of BAFTA for inflicting on them the most atrocious Cockney accent in the history of cinema.”

Continue reading in THE INSIDER: The worst onscreen British accents – INSIDER

The best British horror films of all time – NME

The Wicker Man (1973) Edward Woodward (if you can read that without thinking ‘ee-wah woo-wah’, you didn’t listen to your dad’s jokes closely enough) plays a puritanical policeman sent to investigate disappearances on the remote Summerisle, which turns out have a sort of Royston Vasey-meets-Burning Man vibe. What it says about Britain: Yeah, the Romans […]

 

Continue at NME: The best British horror films of all time – NME