Sir Michael Palin ‘will probably be only knighted Python’ 

Michael Palin has predicted he will be the only Monty Python member to become a sir after being dubbed a knight by Prince William at Buckingham Palace.

“I’ll probably be the only one,” he said, adding that fellow Python John Cleese had turned down the chance.It is not known if Cleese rejected a knighthood, but he did refuse a CBE in 1996 and a peerage in 1999.Sir Michael also said he had managed to suppress a joke while speaking to the Duke of Cambridge on Wednesday.

“He talked about where I was going next, any parts of the world I really wanted to go that I hadn’t already,” revealed the broadcaster.

The 76-year-old said he normally answered “Middlesbrough” when asked the question but on this occasion opted for Kazakhstan.

Sir Michael did in fact visit Middlesbrough, for the first time, in 2015.Speaking after the investiture ceremony, the Pole to Pole presenter also spoke about the BBC’s decision to scrap free TV licences for all over-75s.

He said the BBC had done “a pretty bad deal” in agreeing to take on the cost of free licences in 2015.”I hoped somehow that would somehow go away and it hasn’t gone away,” he continued.”I just wish it wasn’t at the expense of the people who now have to fork out for their licence.

“Sir Michael was knighted in the New Year Honours for services to travel, culture and geography.Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle and Terry Jones are the other surviving members of the Monty Python comedy troupe. Graham Chapman, the sixth member, died in 1989.

Source: Sir Michael Palin ‘will probably be only knighted Python’ – BBC News

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John Cleese: ‘Why don’t you Irish spell your names properly?’

The comedian and actor on his pet hates and staying with the real Basil Fawlty

Yes, John Cleese is as tall as we think, and he still has that gait as he strides on stage to Always Look on the Bright Side of Life. He obliges with occasional oral explosions and outrageous comments, as we require. As he leaves, he snatches his notes from the podium, intentionally all Fawlty-like.

He’s casual, wearing a navy polo short and jacket, and, delightfully, (I’m almost sure) no socks under what look like navy moccasin slippers.

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Talking Peter Sellers and The Goon Show with John Cleese

John Cleese
“You don’t mind if I call you Edward? …”

Talking with the Monty Python member about Peter Sellers, failure, and why he prefers disrespectful interviewers.

It was absurdist. It didn’t try to be intellectual, yet it at its core it still was. I always had an affinity for the silly, and the humor of The Goon Show was just that. It was also very subversive. Spike and [co-creator Harry Secombe] were in the armed forces during the Second World War, you see, and they had developed a rather disrespectful attitude towards authority and the officers, and that was always coming through in the show — just a disrespect for the pompous old-style English guys and the upper class. And that anti-authority really spoke to us [in Python]. People used to ask us to describe what sort of humor Monty Python was because they didn’t know how to categorize us. We’re just silly. Other people who come across us can give us labels if they want.

You’d be hard-pressed to find someone working in comedy that hasn’t creatively cribbed from Monty Python. The influential British comedy troupe’s trademark surrealism, self-referencing, and artistic anarchy has been coded into the DNA of many modern architects of America’s absurdist comedy Zeitgeist, from Doug Kenney to Amy Sedaris to the minds behind Mr. Show. [ . . . ]

Continue at THE VULTURE: Talking Peter Sellers and The Goon Show with John Cleese