Mouse Eat Mouse: Scottish musos on independence and working class liberation

Self-described “extreme folk” Scottish band Mouse Eat Mouse are one of the more obscure acts around, which makes it all the more satisfying to hear any new works.Last year’s Toxic Tails is an album of beauty, anger and passion, traits often missing in today’s sanitised music industry.I decided, therefore, to get in touch with CD Shade, the bald-headed, smooth-singing wordsmith who is the backbone of the act.

It turned out to be a fascinating exchange, Shade [ . . . ]

More at Source: Mouse Eat Mouse: Scottish musos on independence and working class liberation | Green Left Weekly

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The Beautiful Cosmos of Ivor Cutler

The fragmented life of the surrealist, poet, songwriter and eccentric, Ivor Cutler. He shot to fame, when The Beatles cast him in The Magical Mystery Tour. George Martin produced his records, John Peel had him on numerous sessions, Bertrand Russell admired him, he wrote plays for Radio 3. But it is his voice that distinguishes Cutler. His studied melancholia and frail persona tells naive fables which have an existential sting in the tail. He grew up in Glasgow when the pursuit of happiness was never going to be written in the constitution […]

Full Story: BBC Radio 3 – Drama on 3, The Beautiful Cosmos of Ivor Cutler

Ivor Cutler “A Saucer” and other poems

“John Peel has a show on Number One [Radio 1] on which he plays the latest gramophone records,” says Ivor Cutler “He put one of my records on, and a few days later there was a cloud of envelopes coming in. But some people like Cutler, and some people don’t. […] One man called in and said ‘Hey! Get rid of that guy! He’s driving me nuts and his voice is making my wife’s hair stand on end!'”

Scottish poet, humorist and songwriter Ivor Cutler performs his touching, absurd short poems in a gentle Scottish burr. He recorded a total of 21 Peel sessions between 1969 and 1991. ‘I gained a whole new audience thanks to Peel,’ said Cutler. ‘Much to the amazement of my older fans, who find themselves among 16-to-35s in theatres, and wonder where they come from.’ – Keeping It Peel