Michael Moore’s plan for ridding the universe of Trump and the GOP

TRUMP HAS DECLARED WAR ON US AND OUR DEMOCRACY.

By Michael Moore

Trump, right now, tonight, is up to some very nasty, scary stuff — stuff we can’t even imagine — and of course we can’t imagine it because we don’t think like Trump. Our brains are wired for love, empathy, solidarity, compassion, freedom, person, woman, man, camera, TV.

You know like I know that Trump has a devious, wicked plan to destroy this Election. We need to declare, immediately, that it is he and the Republican Party who have to go, for the sake of this country’s existence, they must be crushed and removed.

Trump actually has an arsenal of plans already in action to ensure he never leaves office. He has them all in high gear — some visible, some not. If you could see them all you’d be so stunned, you’d have to immediately convince yourself that there’s no way he can pull this off.

We are all caught in Trump’s Matrix, a mad web, the work of a psychopath-in-chief with tricks so devious that fascists of old, if alive today, would marvel at what Trump has accomplished.

For the next 11 weeks — and then for the 12 weeks between the Election and the Inauguration — Trump is planning nothing but anarchy, chaos, a call to arms of his angry white male followers and the complete destruction of our democracy. You think I’m kidding? You think I’m overstating the case? Do you want to take the risk that I might not be wrong? Most of you understandably chose not to listen to me four years ago when I warned you Trump was going to win the Presidency by taking Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. May I please ask that you now give me your serious attention for what I am about to say — because if I’m right again this time, there won’t be a next time. There will be nothing left for me to warn you about. There probably won’t be much left of me.

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Hydroxychloroquine: Why is the UK bulk-buying Trump’s favourite drug?


The UK has requested 16 million tablets of Hydroxychloroquine, the controversial anti-malarial drug touted as a Covid-19 treatment by Donald Trump.


Is ‘so far, so good’ good enough?

The government has requested 16 million tablets of Hydroxychloroquine, a drug that has not been proven to prevent coronavirus, and has possible dangerous side effects.

This request comes after the US president Donald Trump continually promoted it at press conferences. Now, Donald Trump admits he himself is taking it.

As of yet, there is no evidence to suggest that the drug works for treating coronavirus, with recent tests finding no benefit in taking it.

Anthony Fauci, one of the US’s most trusted experts on infectious disease, warned that it had not been proven to work.

The FDA has also warned consumers against taking it, having been made aware of “serious heart rhythm problems” in patients who were treated with the malaria drugs, often in combination with antibiotic azithromycin.

And even the UK itself does not currently recommend taking it.

The UK’s decision to bulk buy the drug could have an adverse effect elsewhere, with medical groups warning earlier this year of shortages in Europe after Trump’s claims over the drug, which is used to treat malaria and lupus.

With trials now underway in the UK, the question must be asked: is ‘so far so good’ good enough?

Source: Hydroxychloroquine: Why is the UK bulk-buying Trump’s favourite drug? | JOE.co.uk


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For Trump, cruelty IS the message


The plan is to have no plan

By Arthur L. Carter

“There is no genius there, only a damaged human being playing havoc with our lives.”

In this space I am parking my short description of the de facto plan the Trump government has for getting the United States out of the public health emergency caused by the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. This is my read on what the government’s guidance and actions amount to. I will revise the text and add new links as more information flows in. My purpose in posting it is to challenge the American press to be a lot clearer in its descriptions.  

The plan is to have no plan, to let daily deaths between one and three thousand become a normal thing, and then to create massive confusion about who is responsible— by telling the governors they’re in charge without doing what only the federal government can do, by fighting with the press when it shows up to be briefed, by fixing blame for the virus on China or some other foreign element, and by “flooding the zone with shit,” Steve Bannon’s phrase for overwhelming the system with disinformation, distraction, and denial, which boosts what economists call “search costs” for reliable intelligence. 

Stated another way, the plan is to default on public problem solving, and then prevent the public from understanding the consequences of that default. To succeed this will require one of the biggest propaganda and freedom of information fights in U.S. history, the execution of which will, I think, consume the president’s re-election campaign. So much has already been made public that the standard script for a White House cover up (worse than the crime…) won’t apply. Instead, everything will ride on the manufacture of confusion. The press won’t be able to “expose” the plot because it will all happen in stark daylight. The facts will be known, and simultaneously they will be inconceivable. 

“The plan is to have no plan” is not a strategy, really. Nor would I call it a policy. It has a kind of logic to it, but this is different from saying it has a design— or a designer. Meaning: I do not want to be too conspiratorial about this. To wing it without a plan is merely the best this government can do, given who heads the table. The manufacture of confusion is just the ruins of Trump’s personality meeting the powers of the presidency. There is no genius there, only a damaged human being playing havoc with our lives. 

Source: The plan is to have no plan – PressThink


PRESSTHINK, a project of the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University, is written by Jay Rosen.