New outdoor music festival to be staged in Inverness city centre

A new annual outdoor music festival is to be staged in the capital of the Highlands.

A new annual outdoor music festival is to be staged in the capital of the Highlands. The Northern Meeting Park in Inverness will play host to The Gathering, which organisers say will showcase the best music, food and drink from across the Highlands.

It will be launched as a one-day festival in June but is already intended to expand into a two-day event the following year if there is enough public demand.

The “family friendly” event, which will be held in an 8000-capacity arena near the River Ness, is being masterminded by the same organisers behind the long-running Belladrum Tartan Heart Festival, near Beauly.

Trad music festival favourites Tide Lines, The Vatersay Boys, Elephant Sessions. Torridon, Hò-rò and Siobhan Miller are already lined up for next year’s event [ . . . ]

Read more at: New outdoor music festival to be staged in Inverness city centre – The Scotsman

Concert Review: Olivia Chaney

Olivia Chaney begin this concert with a disclaimer. Most frequently described as a folk-singer – and with award nominations to prove it – she sweetly explained that she had no intention in her music of being limited by labels.

Folk music is certainly there in the repertoire, but as this wonderful performance vividly illustrated, there is much more to Chaney than that.

Brought up on her parents records of Fairport Convention, Dylan and Joni Mitchell, trained at the Royal Academy of Music, and with a background working in Shakespearean theatre and jazz, she is a singer, writer and multi-instrumentalist who has produced two exquisite solo albums, as well as collaborating with the Kronos Quartet [ … ]

Continue at THE TELEGRAPH https://www.telegraph.co.uk/music/concerts/olivia-chaneykings-place-london-review-melancholy-has-never/

Chas Hodges, an appreciation: one of the most significant English folk musicians


The Chas and Dave singer, who has died at the age of 74, gave voice to working-class London

Chas Hodges – in company with Dave Peacock – was one of the most original British musicians to have come out of the rock’n’roll era. Chas and Dave did something that had never occurred to anyone else: combining rock, blues, country and music hall with the sound of a London that was already disappearing by the time they released their first album, One Fing ’n’ Anuvver, in 1975.

You might, justifiably, compare the best of their writing to Ronnie Lane, or to Ray Davies, the difference being that Chas and Dave sounded less like a Kinks song than the music one of Davies’ characters might have made.

The best of their songs were the memories of the yellowed wallpaper of the public bar – never the saloon bar – given voice: overheard arguments, declarations of love and shady deals, conducted over two pints of mild and a pack of fags.

Hodges, of course, had a long pedigree before Chas and Dave: he had recorded with Joe Meek, been in the Outlaws with Ritchie Blackmore (which later led to him playing bass for Deep Purple at one show). He played with Jerry Lee Lewis and Gene Vincent. Most famously, the hook he and Peacock recorded for Labi Siffre’s I Got The … became the chassis of Eminem’s first hit, My Name Is [ . . . ]

Continue reading at: Chas Hodges, an appreciation: one of the most significant English folk musicians | Music | The Guardian