Album review: Robin Adams – ‘One Day’

One Day’, the new album from Glasgow songwriter Robin Adams, proves to be a beguiling addition to his body of work.

It is certainly a marked contrast to his last album ‘The Beggar’, with a much warmer tone, albeit with a few lingering traces of melancholia.

‘A Friend of Mine’ opens the album beautifully with a charming ode to friendship which you could easily imagine sound tracking a Wes Anderson film. It’s followed by two heartfelt love songs, the tenderly romantic ‘Dancer In Your Eyes’, and ‘No Reason Why’, which has a childlike innocence to it. It may well be the album highlight and has an almost Beatles-esque melody.

A snippet of commentary from a nature documentary introduces ‘From A Dream’, a lament for the humble robin (the bird, not the songwriter) which somehow manages to sound both mournful and cheerful at the same time. “Can’t see the starlight/From the streetlight / Can’t tell the gutter from the stream / Can you tell the nightmare from the dream” sings Adams, contrasting pastoral and urban imagery. ‘Signs’ is probably the album’s most subdued and melancholic moment while ‘Market Convent Garden’ is a cover of a brilliant song by his father Chris Adams.

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Forget Scotland Street and the School of Art – here are nine less well-known Glasgow addresses connected to Charles Rennie Mackintosh

IT IS now recognised as one of Glasgow’s finest buildings – but the city’s School Board gave its famous architect a sharp rap on the knuckles when he submitted his final plans.

Charles Rennie Mackintosh got a bit of a row when he ‘added some creative flourishes’ to his original ideas for Scotland Street School, according to a letter which has resurfaced in Glasgow City Archives.

“It seems true that Mackintosh had definite ideas and may have been difficult to work with,” smiles archivist Michael Gallagher. “In the letter, they state they have ‘no desire for controversy but the attitude taken by Mr Mackintosh in his interview with the committee and in his letter…leaves us no alternative’, and called the architect’s embellishes, ‘absolutely objectionable from the point of view of school working’.”

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Burnistoun “Mad Uncles”

BBC Scotland and BBC One Scotland and BBC Two Scotland sketch show from Robert Florence and Iain Connell. 22 episodes 2009 – 2019.

Robert Florence and Iain Connell write and perform this sketch show set in a fictional Scottish location that somehow seems eerily familiar. Burnistoun has its own newspaper, furniture store, gym, pub and all-you-can-eat buffet restaurant, radio station and even an ice-cream van.

Characters include Uncle Willie the man who insists on having his own funeral before he dies, wannabe girl-band singer Jackie McGlade who can make any tune sexy except football songs, and John and Terry two pub pals who insist they do not fantasize about each other sexually.

Other Burnistoun characters include disgruntled serial killer The Burnistoun Butcher, and snippy siblings, Paul and Walter, who share high drama inside their ice cream van.

More about Burnistoun at Comedy UK