Irish Talent and Film Recognised in BAFTA Longlists

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) today announced the full set of longlists of films and talent that have gone through to Round Two of voting for the 2023 EE BAFTA Film Awards. We are delighted to see that several Irish films and story makers were featured in the 24 categories, including three Screen Ireland-supported films.

An Cailín Ciúin (The Quiet Girl) has recently made history as the first Irish language film to be shortlisted for the Oscars, and continues to confirm its hit status with audiences and critics alike this awards season after an exceptional year rich in festival and cinema screenings. An intricate, deeply felt coming-of-age drama that delves into the meaning of family through the eyes of a neglected young girl, the film is longlisted in three categories, including Best Director (Colm Bairéad), Adapted Screenplay and Film Not In The English Language.

Two Screen Ireland-supported documentaries are also featured on today’s longlists. Nothing Compares, Kathryn Ferguson’s richly cinematic portrait of Sinéad OʼConnorʼs phenomenal rise to worldwide fame and exile from the pop mainstream, is shortlisted in the Oustanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer category. The documentary and An Cailín Ciúin are both currently screening in select cinemas across Ireland showcasing the best of 2022 Irish film, including the Irish Film Institute and Light House Cinema.

A fascinating look at the life and legend of an iconic Irish actor, Adrian Sibley’s The Ghost of Richard Harris is a feature documentary which recalls the life of the legendary actor, poet, and singer with the help of his sons, his friends and exclusive footage and interviews. The film is longlisted in the Documentary category. After a World Premiere at the Venice Film Festival this summer, the film was released in a limited theatrical run, followed by a streaming release on Sky Arts.

We are also delighted to see Irish talent recognised with the inclusion of multiple films featuring Irish cast, crew and locations, including The WonderGood Luck To You, Leo GrandeRoald Dahl’s Matilda The Musical and The Banshees of Inisherin. Congratulations to all longlisted films, and wishing them the best for the second round of voting.

Final nominations in all categories will be announced on Thursday 19th January, a month before the EE BAFTA Films Awards ceremony on 19th February at the Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall. The full list of longlisted films can be found here.

 

Source: Irish Talent and Film Recognised in BAFTA Longlists

Alasdair Roberts & Brigid Mae Power – The Blacksmith

Watch Alasdair Roberts and Brigid Mae Power performing ‘The Blacksmith’ for the Museum of Literature Ireland as part of their Myth, Story, Song series.

Watch Scottish musician Alasdair Roberts and Irish musician Brigid Mae Power performing ‘The Blacksmith’ for the Museum of Literature Ireland as part of their Myth, Story, Song series that features performances by Irish and Scottish writers and musicians.

The song is a traditional English song, which was collected by the composer Ralph Vaughan Williams from singer Ellen Powell in 1909.

Brigid performed The Blacksmith on her Head Above The Water album with Brian Mac Gloinn (Ye Vagabonds) on backing vocals. Alasdair also performed on the album which he co-produced alongside Brigid and Peter Broderick.

Alasdair also performed the song with David McGuiness for the Shirley Collins tribute album ‘Shirley Inspired‘ (Earth Records, 2015). For that recording, McGuiness accompanied Roberts on the piano. This version, while brighter, thanks to twin acoustic guitars, and slightly faster paced (similar to Brigid’s album version), still allows Powers the space to introduce some beautiful vocal ornamentation with Roberts also throwing in some welcome fingerstyle guitar for good measure. They are both unique vocalists in the folk world with a very individual style that’s instantly recognizable. Needless to say, I’m a huge fan of both of them, so it’s a real treat to hear them performing this classic folk ballad together.

Source: Alasdair Roberts & Brigid Mae Power – The Blacksmith

Derry Girls is comedy gold, but its last episode was no grand finale

Derry Girls final episode

Derry Girls finale review: Alas, the last episode overdoes it with a one hour special

By Ed Power

Derry Girls is such a beloved series Channel 4 has given it not one finale but two. Technically, Lisa McGee’s Northern Ireland comedy took its bows on Tuesday night – and on a bleak note with the sudden death of the father of Nicola Coughlan’s Clare.

But scarcely have audiences had a chance to dab away tears than it’s back for an even grander grand farewell in the form of a one-off, feature-length special (Channel 4, 9pm).

The idea is to apply a big shiny, full stop to a show that has become an unlikely juggernaut – who’d have imagined international viewers would go gaga for an ensemble chortlefest set in the final years of the Troubles?

But while Derry Girls makes an appropriate fuss of its leave-taking this is accompanied by bucketfuls of saccharine – plus a truly bizarre cameo (see below). And so, when people fondly reminisce about Derry Girls years from now, it is probable they won’t be thinking back to tonight’s sappy sign-off.

It’s 1998 and Ireland is about to vote on the Good Friday Agreement (yes, the one Brexit is doing its best to unravel). Yet for Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) and friends the big occasion on the horizon is an upcoming birthday party.

Two parties in fact: to save money, Erin and cousin Orla (Louisa Harland) are throwing a joint 18th-birthday shindig. Sadly, they have clashing ideas as to what makes a killer bash. Erin wants to celebrate great female authors. Orla is keen on a monkey-themed soiree.

Uncertainty likewise stretches ahead of Sister Michael (Siobhán McSweeney), who is informed she is to be moved on from Our Lady Immaculate College. Her work is done, new challenges await, she is told.

Closer to home, chaos engulfs Erin’s parents (Tara Lynne-O’Neill and Tommy Tiernan) with the return of Cousin Eamon (Ardal O’Hanlon), a Father Dougal type whose speciality is spreading good-natured havoc.

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