Cunk on Money

“Put simply, money is the best way we have of telling how much money you’ve got”  – Philomenia Cunk

Welcome to the wonkiest pub in Britain 

Welcome to the wonkiest pub in Britain

What would you expect from a pub called the Crooked House?

Himley is a small village situated between Dudley and Wolverhampton. It is mostly unremarkable, and is perhaps best known as being the home of Himley Hall, the former home of the Lords of Dudley.

Himley has another claim to fame though, in that it is home to the wonkiest pub in Britain: the Crooked House.

Originally a farmhouse, this building became a pub in the 1800s, by which point it had already begun sinking to one side due to mining in the area.

It remains a pub, despite being condemned as unsafe roughly 80 years ago. With all this knowledge in mind, JOE decided to take a trip to this pub, to see if it’s all it’s cracked up to be and whether the rumours of gravitational anomalies are actually true.

Source: Welcome to the wonkiest pub in Britain | JOE.co.uk

The Crown: ‘Royal Family’ documentary that the Queen quietly banned

 

For the 27 million people who watched the Queen act alongside James Bond in the 2012 London Olympic opening ceremony, or the six million people who watch her Christmas speech every year – it might come as a surprise that the Queen has kept one of her most notable TV appearances under lock and key for nearly 40 years.

Viewers of episode 4, season 3 of The Crown, will see how a documentary made in 1969 about the British royal family was withdrawn from broadcast by Her Majesty after only three public viewings, following of widespread criticism.

The Netflix drama follows the Queen, played by Olivia Colman, and her close family as they organise scripts and film scenes over the course of a year of their lives, before eventually watching it air — and dealing with the ensuing fallout. But did it really happen?

Viewers may be surprised to learn that the 110-minute film, titled Royal Family, was indeed filmed and subsequently taken off air by the Queen. In 2019, it continues to fall under the crown’s copyright, meaning it hasn’t been shown in public since 1972.

How did the film come about?

Towards the end of the “swinging sixties” the royal family felt increasingly out of touch with the new liberal mood of the country. Journalist Malcolm Muggeridge appeared on American television in 1964, telling viewers: “The English are getting bored with their monarchy.” Continue reading

There’s a lot to hate in Love Actually. But it’s also the ultimate Christmas fantasy

Love Actually

Ignore the sexism if you can, and revel in a world of palatial flats where everyone adores the prime minister, says Guardian columnist Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett

By: Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett

What is it about Love Actually? Richard Curtis’s ensemble Yuletide schmaltz-fest came out 16 years ago, and yet whether you adore it or despise it – for this has never been a film to provoke milquetoast emotions – you can’t deny that it remains a cultural touchstone.

The Christmas-centric plot facilitates the film’s annual exhumation by the sort of earmuff-sporting crowd who get excited about the switch to red Styrofoam cups in high street coffee chains, duly followed by its summary dissection by a bunch of misanthropic pseudo-nihilist killjoys whose concept of festive filmic fun is limited to watching the snowy bits in Andrei Rublev. No one comes out of this grudge match well. As I read on a desk once, the darkest parts of hell are reserved for those who, in times of moral conflict, maintain their neutrality (it was attributed to Friedrich Nietzsche, but it seems it’s actually Dan Brown).

Surely, you are thinking, it’s just a Christmas movie? You are wrong. It isn’t just a Christmas movie. It is the Christmas movie that devours all other Christmas movies. Continue reading