Lesley Manville on Working With Daniel Day-Lewis and Acting’s Long Game

LONDON — Despite the horrifying headlines of the past few months, there are still a lot of nice guys working in film and theater. Just ask the 61 year-old actress Lesley Manville, who stars opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in “Phantom Thread,” the new film by Paul Thomas Anderson.

“Beautiful, inside and out, both of them,” says Manville of her costar and director, adding that, on set, she would often think to herself, “I’ve got a pretty good job. There’s some good eye candy in this room. Working with these two gorgeous men every day — I can’t complain.”

Manville, one of Britain’s most versatile and hard-working actresses, say

Manville, one of Britain’s most versatile and hardworking actresses, says she took the role because she wanted to work with Anderson [ . . . ] More: Lesley Manville on Working With Daniel Day-Lewis and Acting’s Long Game

Advertisements

This Is The Kit: Tiny Desk Concert

https://www.npr.org/templates/event/embeddedVideo.php?storyId=568318255&mediaId=570197758

Effortless storytelling is at the heart of This Is The Kit. And the stories the band’s only permanent member, Kate Stables, weaves are profound but sweet with a tone that quietly reels you in.

“Bullet Proof” is the opening song at the Tiny Desk – and the opening track on her fourth album, Moonshine Freeze – a song that sees the darkest challenges in life as a way to begin again. “Everything we broke today/Needing breaking, anyway,” Kate Stables sings as she’s picking on her banjo with tides of percussion and bass flowing in. It takes two minutes before the perfectly punctuated guitar hits but completely worth the wait.

That gradual unfolding is the strength of these songs and this band. “Moonshine Freeze,” the last one they perform at the Tiny Desk, is the title track to the new album produced by John Parish. It’s a song taken from a children’s clapping game: Say “moonshine” three times, then freeze. But the song takes these images deeper, looking at patterns in the repetitive words, specifically patterns of three, which in Kate’s mind forms a triangle or a delta and it just gets deeper.

Lovers of Sufjan Stevens will appreciate the gentle ways Kate Stables can touch a heart with a song. And the band she plays with here is tightly in touch with how best to support these tunes.

Set List

  • “Bullet Proof”
  • “Hotter Colder”
  • “Moonshine Freeze”

MUSICIANS

Katherine Stables, Rosalind Leyden, Jamie Whitby-Coles, Noil Smith, Adam Schatz, Jonah Parzen-Johnson

CREDITS

Producers: Bob Boilen, Morgan Noelle Smith; Creative Director: Bob Boilen; Audio Engineer: Josh Rogosin; Videographers: Morgan Noelle Smith, Bronson Arcuri, Alyse Young; Production Assistant: Salvatore Maicki; Photo: Jennifer Kerrigan/NPR

For more Tiny Desk concerts, subscribe to our podcast.

 

Source: This Is The Kit: Tiny Desk Concert

Is Stonehenge a Giant Ritualistic Shadow Puppet Dick? 

Stonehenge: More like Dickhenge? One archaeologist posits such a theory ..

The Telegraph points to new analysis by Professor Terence Meaden, who looked at stone circles across Britain, including Stonehenge, “filming their changing silhouettes during sunrise on ritually significant dates of the year.” He argues that the purpose of these sites was, essentially, to create giant shadow dicks for ritual purposes. “My basic discovery is that many stone circles were built at a time of a fertility religion, and that stones were positioned such that at sunrise on auspicious dates of the year phallic shadows would be cast from a male-symbolic stone to a waiting female-symbolic stone,” said Meaden. Regarding Stonehenge specifically:

“At Stonehenge on days of clear sunrise the shadow of the externally sited phallic Heel Stone penetrates the great monument in the week of the summer solstice and finally arrives at the recumbent Altar Stone, which is symbolically female. Devised in the late Neolithic this could be a dramatic visual representation of the cosmic consummation of the gods between a sky father and the earth mother goddess.”

This is not the prevailing interpretation of the site, which has in recent years has yielded interesting new finds thanks to advancing technology.  [ . . . ] More: Is Stonehenge a Giant Ritualistic Shadow Puppet Dick? 

Another Early Man trailer and new artwork unleashed

Aardman’s Nick Park is currently beavering away to complete Early Man – his caveman-themed first feature since 2005’s Wallace and Gromit in The Curse of the Werewolf – in time for its January 26 release date. So far, UK distributor Studiocanal has released just one trailer and a handful of stills.

But in the US, where the film is released on February 16, distributor Lionsgate has released an additional trailer and some amusing artwork putting a Stone/Bronze Age twist on familiar modern devices, such as the fossil watch, the iStone and the beetle razor (which you can see tribal Chief Bobnar wielding in the new trailer). And who could resist Boar Snot (“For that just walked out of the cave feeling”)?

Source: Another Early Man trailer and new artwork unleashed