Video: The making of Local Hero – the musical stage production 

The Scotsman’s Joyce McMillan talks to David Greig, artistic director at The Royal Lyceum Theatre Edinburgh, about the making of the stage musical adaptation of the cult film Local Hero.

Source: Video: The making of Local Hero – the musical stage production – The Scotsman

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Serenity Now: Music And A Conversation With Joan Shelley

The Hobbledehoy is vey much looking forward to hearing Joan Shelley perform in Boston on Friday night. Though she hails from Kentucky, Joan’s music borrows quite a lot from British traditional folk sounds, and English vocalists like June Tabor, who she frequently cites as a major influence. Give a listen to NPR’s All Songs Considered interview below.

In this All Songs Considered guest DJ session, Joan Shelley talks about her latest album, Like the River Loves the Sea and shares songs by some of the other artists who’ve inspired her over the years.

Joan Shelley makes music that lulls my soul. Her new album, Like the River Loves the Sea, is a serene experience. It’s music with a deep connection to British folk music from the ’60s and ’70s but with influences from this side of the world and her home of Louisville, Kentucky.

On this edition of All Songs Considered, Joan Shelley is joined by her musical partner and Louisville companion, guitarist Nathan Salsburg to play DJ. You can hear the roots of the music they make in the songs they chose to share, from American banjo legend Roscoe Holcomb to English folk singer June Tabor and the contemporary music of Bonnie “Prince” Billy.

Joan Shelley tells the story of recording Like the River Loves the Sea in Iceland and how they had to forgo adding banjo to the album because they couldn’t locate one in Iceland. We also hear Joan Shelley’s early trio called Maiden Radio, Joan and Nathan’s new collaboration with Bonnie “Prince” Billy and how she met him at an ugly sweater party in Kentucky [ . . . ]

LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW with JOAN SHELLEY at: Serenity Now: Music And A Conversation With Joan Shelley

Is Trump worried about impeachment? Her answer is awesome!

On the Quora website, Kelly Schweighsr from Philadelphia replied to the question “does Donald Trump worry about impeachment?” THE HOBBLEDEHOY think her answer was awesome:

“I think that Trump worries a great deal about impeachment, but less about the political ramifications than the potential criminal prosecution. I believe that Trump only wants to stay in office because he believes it gives him blanket immunity and allows him to enrich himself at tax-payer expense.

If his tax returns become public he may have to pay back taxes and fines, or it may be revealed that he committed bank fraud which could send him to prison and result in a hefty fine. Trump’s finances have always been dodgy, He has never been as wealthy as he has claimed to be. He presidency has actually harmed his brand and would be costing him money if he weren’t charging the Secret Service full rack rate to protect him (and getting foreign governments to book rooms at his hotels but not stay in them).

He accuses Hillary of cheating because he cheated. He accuses everyone of treason because he knows he is breaking laws he swore to uphold.

Trump has always projected what he is doing or planning on doing on to other people. He accuses Hunter Biden of profiting from Joe Biden’s position because his children, Don Jr., Eric and Ivanka (and Jared) are profiting from his presidency. He accuses Hillary of cheating because he cheated. He accuses everyone of treason because he knows he is breaking laws he swore to uphold.

The Presidency is stressful. Donald Trump has never had to manage so many people – his business only employed a few dozen people directly. He doesn’t understand how politics works, the duties and responsibilities of the office or the limits of his power – and that frustrates him. While he loves the attention, particularly that of the adoring crowds at his rallies, he hates the way the media covers him. Trump is used to controlling the message – either through cozy arrangements with the National Enquirer, or by distracting the press with some new outrage. But he has lost that control and he is flailing as a result.

Trump is 73 years old, he is obese, his health is failing, his diet is crap and he doesn’t exercise. He is showing signs of cognitive decline – and his father suffered from dementia, so Trump may be aware that his mind is going. Now pile on all the investigations, the impeachment inquiry, the disaster in Syria and it becomes obvious that he is under more mental stress than he has ever been in his life.

I believe that Trump is worried about the almost inevitable impeachment – but that he is more worried that he will be exposed before the world for what he is and what he has done – and the idea that he might be revealed as a con-man, a cheat, a liar, a thief, a money launderer – or even worse, a poor man who colluded with Vladimir Putin is an effort to make millions and an incompetent manager – terrifies him.

Like a cornered rat, Trump is fighting for his very life – and I believe that he will become much less rational and much more dangerous as the walls close in.”

Source QUORA.COM https://www.quora.com/Does-Donald-Trump-worry-about-impeachment

Why the world is turning to Hannah Arendt to explain Trump

George Orwell’s “1984” is not the only classic that’s celebrating a comeback. Hannah Arendt’s philosophical essay “The Origins of Totalitarianism” has also spiked in interest recently. Here’s why it’s so relevant.

Born in Germany to a Jewish family, Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) fled when Adolf Hitler rose to power in 1933. She spent time as a stateless refugee in France and was deported to an internment camp under the Vichy regime. She emigrated to the United States in 1941, later becoming a US citizen.

Having experienced first-hand the near collapse of an advanced civilization, she also became one of the first political theorists to analyze how totalitarian political movements could rise in the early 20th century.

The roots of Nazism and Stalinism are described in her first major book, “The Origins of Totalitarianism,” originally published in English in 1951.

It has been compulsory reading for many college students ever since, but the dense political work of over 500 pages isn’t typically a bestseller. It has been flying off bookshelves in the US since Trump’s inauguration; Amazon even briefly ran out of stock this week.

These new Arendt fans are presumably trying to understand what Trump’s presidency could lead to. As it might take a while for readers to get through her heavy essays, here are a few spoilers: “Trump is not a totalitarian in her understanding; he incorporates what she calls ‘elements’ of totalitarianism,” Roger Berkowitz, professor and head of the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanity at Bard College in New York, explained in a recent DW interview.

However, strong warning signs shouldn’t be ignored, added Berkowitz: Arendt believed that “one of the core elements of totalitarianism is that it’s based in a movement… and Trump has explicitly called himself the mouthpiece of a movement. That’s a very dangerous position for a politician.”

DW News Hannah Arendt Zitate ENG

Populism: easy fixes in times of global anxiety

Arendt’s analysis focuses on the events of that period. Although her observations obviously couldn’t explain everything about today’s complex political developments, many are still revealing even now, as the right-wing populism that’s spreading throughout Europe and the US is reminiscent in different ways of the situation in the 1920s and 30s that allowed the Nazis and Communists to rise. Continue reading