Scottish pop princess Clare Grogan brings Altered Images to Edinburgh for first headline gig in 13 years

Clare Grogan

THEY’LL be singing Happy Birthday at the Liquid Room this week, but not that Happy Birthday, rather the 1981 Top 10 hit for Altered Images when Scotland’s very own pop princess Clare Grogan returns to the Capital with her band.

The summer she left school, Grogan not only landed a role in Bill Forsyth’s award-winning film Gregory’s Girl but also secured a deal for her band with Sony Records.

 
 

Altered Images quickly achieved worldwide success, selling millions of records and topping the charts in several countries, including three Top 10 albums and six Top 40 hits in the UK. Voted Best New Group at the NME Awards that same year, they played at The Royal Command Performance and Grogan recently received a Special Recognition Award at the Scottish Music Awards.

A woman of many talents, Grogan, who brings Altered Images to the the Liquid Room on Thursday 20 February, is also an accomplished actor and novelist. Her TV credits include Skins, which she also wrote songs for, Waterloo Road, EastEnders, Doctors, Red Dwarf and Father Ted.

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Three new clips arrive for Michael Winterbottom’s ‘Greed’ with Steve Coogan

The film features an all-star cast including Isla Fisher (Nocturnal Animals, Wedding Crashers), David Mitchell (Peep Show, Upstart Crow), Asa Butterfield (Sex Education, Journey’s End), Sophie Cookson (Kingsman franchise, Red Joan), Dinita Gohil (The Infiltrator, The Snowman), Jamie Blackley (The Last Kingdom, Traitors), Shanina Shaik (The Mummy), Tim Key (Alan Partridge series, Pls Like), Sarah Solemani (Bridget Jones’s Baby, Him & Her), Asim Chaudhry (People Just Do Nothing, Happy New Year, Colin Burstead), Ollie Locke (Made in Chelsea, Plebs), Pearl Mackie (Doctor Who), Jonny Sweet (Johnny English Strikes Again, Loaded), Shirley Henderson (Stan & Ollie, T2 Trainspotting) and Stephen Fry (The Hobbit series, Gosford Park).

Here’s the official synopsis:

GREED tells the story of self-made British billionaire Sir Richard McCreadie (Steve Coogan), whose retail empire is in crisis. For 30 years he has ruled the world of retail fashion – bringing the high street to the catwalk and the catwalk to the high street – but after a damaging public inquiry, his image is tarnished. To save his reputation, he decides to bounce back with a highly publicised and extravagant party celebrating his 60th birthday on the Greek island of Mykonos. A satire on the grotesque inequality of wealth in the fashion industry, the film sees McCreadie’s rise and fall through the eyes of his biographer, Nick (David Mitchell).

Check out the brand new clips below.

Source: Three new clips arrive for Michael Winterbottom’s ‘Greed’ with Steve Coogan

“I use the best, I use the rest”

Blond ambition: the rise and rise of Johnny Flynn, a man for all seasons

He’s already a star of folk music, stage and film, and now the actor is bringing a blond – and nude – Mr Knightley to cinemas in a new take on Emma

Being a fictional hero was once a more straightforward business. You were handsome, you were honourable and brave: you were in. Colin Firth only had to dampen his white shirt a little to update Jane Austen’s most famous romantic lead, Mr Darcy, in the hit 1995 television adaptation of Pride and Prejudice.

But changing times call for a fresh approach. And so the portrayal of Mr Knightley, hero of the latest big-screen version of Austen’s Emma, has been the subject of much speculation ahead of the film’s opening on 14 February.

Johnny Flynn, actor, musician and renaissance man, has the tricky job of measuring up to every Austen fan’s dreams of George Knightley, the wise and kindly figure who has always rivalled the more austere Darcy in readers’ affections.

Newspaper headlines so far have inevitably focused on a scene in which Flynn appears nude. “Move over Mr Darcy!” cried the Daily Mail.

Flynn as George Knightley in director Autumn de Wilde’s Emma.
 Flynn as George Knightley in director Autumn de Wilde’s Emma. Photograph: Focus Features

If Flynn, who will also appear on screen this year as David Bowie

in Stardust, as well as in British film The Dig, already looks familiar, it is because of his recent role in the BBC serialisation of Les Misérables, or as the dependable William Dobbin in ITV’s Vanity Fair. Yet the actor, 36, says he knew from the start that he had to handle Knightley with especial care. Quite apart from the line in the novel where his character admits to having loved Emma Woodhouse, 16 years his junior, since she was 13 years old, Knightley also does a fair amount of moral lecturing. Something the director, Autumn de Wilde, admits can read today like “mansplaining”.

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