Nic Jones “Canadee-I-O”

Canadee-I-O by Nic Jones, from his album Penguin Eggs.



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Holborn Dining Room: ‘Its pork pie is a bold expression of pig’

If you come here and don’t order a pie, you’ll only have yourself to blame. Don’t let me down, says Jay Rayner

My late mother had no truck with religious observance. She preferred cultural signifiers of her Jewishness like a full fridge, a belief in the utilitarian qualities of cake liberally applied and a hatred of silence at the table. There was, however, one way in which she observed Jewish religious ritual, though she was utterly bewildered when I pointed it out to her. She liked to cook gefilte fish, that sustaining mix of ground white fish, bound with matzo meal and sweetened with sugar. It comes in two forms. There is the boiled, served cold with its own fishy jelly, an abomination I always regarded as the closest food could come to cruel and unusual punishment. And then there is the fried, which is a different matter altogether. It should be crisp and golden outside and light and fluffy inside. Cooking them made the house smell of indulgence. I would watch them being lifted from the oil with a slotted spoon to the rack to cool a little. At which point I would try to take one and would have my hand verbally slapped away. “Not until they’re cold.”

I was baffled. Eventually I became old enough to do a bit of reading and investigation. Gefilte fish is food for the Sabbath, when no work can be done. They are to be cooked in advance, so the family has something ready for after sundown. Hence, by necessity they are served cold. My mother, who saw religious dogma (rightly) as the cause of so much suffering, had carried one small piece of it into her kitchen, from her adored grandmother’s. When I pointed this out, she was horrified. She let me eat one hot. God, it was good: the just-fried shell, yielding beneath my teeth, giving way to gusts of hot, sweet fishy steam and soft white flesh. Oy, and as I believe some people still say, Vey.

In what I recognise may be one of the greatest dietary non-sequiturs of all time, I have long felt the same way about pork pies. I bloody love a pork pie. All culinary traditions have a way of using up bits of animal that might otherwise go to waste, and the pork pie is one of our noblest. I love the interplay of crisp, animal fat-boosted hot water pastry, the dense meaty filling, punched up with white pepper, and then the jelly, reintroduced back to the tight cavities from which it has leaked during cooking. The thing is, I have always wondered how marvellous one would be straight out of the oven.

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Continue this wonderful restaurant review at THE GUARDIAN : Holborn Dining Room: ‘Its pork pie is a bold expression of pig’ – restaurant review | Life and style | The Guardian

Richard Thompson Tears It Up On Two New Songs

One of the greatest living guitarists, Richard Thompson has shared two new brilliant songs from his just-announced album 13 Rivers.

I’m thrilled to have two new songs from one of our greatest living guitarists and songwriters, Richard Thompson. His just-announced 19th solo album, 13 Rivers, still finds him brimming with bursts of guitar magic and storytelling. It’s a trademark sound that has been incredibly influential since the days when he electrified British folk music in the 1960s as part of Fairport Convention and, later, some of the most brilliant records of the 1970s with his wife at the time Linda Thompson. But Richard Thompson is not stuck in any one era and his solo records continue to influence younger musicians with it’s deft playing and the way he spins a tale.

 

The two new songs today continue his tradition of turning life’s journey into song. “The Storm Won’t Come” tackles the desire for change and comes to the conclusion that you can’t hurry it. In an email, Richard Thompson wrote to say it’s “a song about change – out with the old, in with the new. In spite of your efforts, you cannot synthesize change, it is a natural process.”

The second song we have from 13 Rivers is a stuttering, fast-paced tune called “Bones of Gilead.” Richard Thompson says “this is about an impending crisis, but it’s a good crisis. It’s an uncomfortable process to go through, one you may barely survive, but it brings knowledge and growth and love.”

What’s my name? My name is heartbreak
Heartbreak of the giving kind
I will come and whisper sweetness
Sweetness that will dawn your mind
No rib cage can hold me
No loving cup
I don’t fit your wise world
I tear it up

And tear it up he does on these cuts and the other 11 on the 13 Rivers. The self-produced album was recorded and mixed by Clay Blair at Boulevard Recording, an old, famed studio in Hollywood. “It used to be Hollywood trendy, but it fell into total disrepair,” says Thompson. “It’s still got some gaps in the walls. I like studios that are honest. It’s about the décor of the sound, and there’s a specific sound to Boulevard.”

These songs were written at what Richard Thompson describes as a dark time in his life without being specific. These songs came “as if they’d been channeled from somewhere else. You find deeper meaning in the best records as time goes on. The reward comes later.”

13 Rivers will be out on New West Records September 14.

Source NPR: Richard Thompson Tears It Up On Two New Songs : All Songs Considered : NPR



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Hollywood-worthy gems in the UK – from medieval forts to Harry Potter beaches

AS the UK continues to sizzle in the sun, it’s the perfect time to take a well-earned staycation – but where to start?

Award-winning British movie location expert Tom Howard has shared what he believes are some of the country’s most exciting ‘hidden treasures’.

Tom has years of expertise in the world of film and TV, on movies and shows like The Night Manager and A Monster Calls, where his 9-5 involves locating the most breath-taking and beautiful parts of the British Isles.Exclusively for Premier Inn, Tom has opened up his professional notebooks to create a list of ten less well-known locations that he believes are perfect for a 2018 summer staycation.He said: “The primary duty of a location manager is to discover places to film which are interesting, unique and not often in the public eye – from a castle on a hill in the middle of Scotland to a heritage railway in eastern Lancashire.”These really wonderful destinations may not be the first place that travellers think of but, trust me, they are well worth a visit.” [ . . . ]

Continue at THE SUN: Hollywood-worthy gems in the UK – from medieval forts to Harry Potter beaches