Sex Pistols’ Steve Jones on ‘Never Mind The Bollocks’, reunions and John Lydon’s Trump comments

 

Sex Pistols‘ Steve Jones has spoken to NME ahead of the punk band’s upcoming deluxe edition of their seminal ‘Never Mind The Bollocks, Here’s The Sex Pistols’ album. Buy Sex Pistols merchandise here The iconic group’s classic album will be reissued to celebrate the record’s 40th anniversary. Label USM/UMC has announced that the out-of-print deluxe edition of the album, which was originally released in 2012, will now be re-released on December 1. You can pre-order it here. As well as this, a new book called The Sex Pistols 1977: The Bollocks Diaries is out on October 26. It tells the story of the “chaos and creation” of the band’s famous record, as told by the Pistols themselves. Buy it here. Surrounding these two releases, Sex Pistols guitarist Jones spoke to NME about the legacy of ‘Never Mind The Bollocks’, saying: “We didn’t really have any expectations and that’s probably why it is still talked about”. He also revealed why he wouldn’t reunite with the Sex Pistols again in the future and what he thinks about John Lydon’s controversial Donald Trump comments.

Read NME‘s Q&A with Sex Pistols’ Steve Jones below:

It’s been 40 years since ‘Never Mind The Bollocks’. When you were recording the album, did you think you’d still be talking about the record four decades later?

“No, not at all, you never know that. We were just doing it, we didn’t really have any expectations and that’s probably why it is still talked about – because it wasn’t preconceived, we just didn’t know where it could go. It wasn’t like a band who went to a record label and the record label said ‘I don’t hear any singles here’, you know? We were just coming from a different place where it was more about ‘this is what we do and we want to get it on to tape’. It’s just one of those things — short lived, but it’s quite amazing really that forty years later people are still talking about it.”

What do you think the record’s legacy has been?

“I think it’s very inspirational to other bands and it’s just a little time capsule really.” What other albums do you think we’ll still be listening to in 40 years time? “David Bowie’s ‘The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars’.”

Any modern albums? You appeared in Arctic Monkeys’ ‘R U Mine’ video. Are they the kind of band that will span generations like Sex Pistols have?

“I’m not sure, because I’m not a young person, they have different feelings towards Alex Turner than I do. I think Arctic Monkeys are a great band. I even like the Last Shadow Puppets last album (‘Everything That You’ve Come To Expect’) better than Arctic Monkeys. I think he’s a talented guy, Alex Turner, and when Alex and Miles Kane get together they come up with good stuff.”

Would you say grime is the new punk?

“I don’t know what that is, I’m too old… Like chav music? Well, it’s good that young people are looking …Continue reading » Source: Sex Pistols’ Steve Jones on ‘Never Mind The Bollocks’, reunions and John Lydon’s Trump comments – NME

Advertisements

Every Single One of Bubble’s Outfits on ‘Absolutely Fabulous,’ Ranked

With all the talk of an Absolutely Fabulous film of late, Flavorwire has been relishing the opportunity to revisit one of the most consistently hilarious comedies of the last 20 years or so. (It’s not like we really need any excuse, to be honest.) There are many, many things to love about Ab Fab, but somewhere near the top of the list is the, ahem, unique fashion sense of Bubble, Edina’s gloriously ditzy assistant. And so, here is a labor of love: every single outfit Bubble has worn on the show, ranked in definitive order, from awesome to even more awesome [ . . . ]

More at: Every Single One of Bubble’s Outfits on ‘Absolutely Fabulous,’ Ranked – Flavorwire

Family Flavours in Mike Leigh’s ‘Life is Sweet’ 

Mike Leigh's Life Is Sweet
Mike Leigh’s Life Is Sweet

Children are seldom seen in the cinema of Mike Leigh. This absence is doubtless due to the strictures of the director’s character- and story-building methods, which might make the participation of child actors in Leighland rather problematic. In fact, the only notable child protagonist in Leigh’s cinema is Charlie (Charlie Difford), Poppy’s student in Happy-Go-Lucky (2008), and even here the boy’s problems are merely used as a plot device to bring together the heroine and a social worker love interest. Though the issue is sometimes thematised in Leigh’s portraits of couples who are unable to conceive, the absence of children can seem a significant blind spot in films that clearly aspire to the presentation of full, detailed, realistically depicted social worlds.

Read Full Review at: Family Flavours in Mike Leigh’s ‘Life is Sweet’ | PopMatters