A day late but… here’s a St. Patrick’s Day music special

00:00 Skipper’s Alley – The Farmer’s Curst Wife
03:40 Breabach – Proud to Play a Pipe
10:18 Mick Hanly & Mícheál O Dhomhnaill – An Bothán A Bhaigh Fionnghuala
12:12 The Bonny Men – Jenny’s Welcome To Charlie
17:06 The Deadlians – I don’t wanna ride yer aul one anymore.
19:46 The Spook of the Thirteenth Lock – Suffer the Wait
24:15 Trembling Bells – The Auld Triangle
30:05 Declan O’Rourke – Indian Meal
33:25 Ensemble Ériu – Gleann na Réimsí
39:17 Joe Heaney – Singing in Connemara (Extract)
39:43 Lisa O’Neill – As I Roved Out
44:24 Ye Vagabonds – When We Were Trees
46:35 Brìghde Chaimbeul – Mary Breenan’s / The Reeling, The Reeling
49:49 Croft No. Five – Track 1
55:07 Breda Smyth – Bachelor’s Walk
59:07 Shooglenifty – Samhla Reel / Scolpaig
01:05:19 Ross Ainslie, Ali Hutton – Action
01:09:24 Jiggy – Ócam an Phríosúin
01:13:04 Martin Low / Martyn Bennett – This Sky Thunders

Despite being a St Patrick’s Day special, there’s also a nice mix of Scottish artists included – we even start in a well known fictional pub on a Hebridean island – Summerisle.

Featuring Skipper’s Alley, Breabach, The Bonny Men, The Spook of the Thirteenth Lock, The Deadlians, Trembling Bells (ft. Alasdair Roberts, Ricky Ross, Dan Haywood, Mike Heron, Scott Fagan and Amy Cutler), Declan O’Rourke, Ensemble Ériu, Lisa O’Neill, Joe Heaney, Ye Vagabonds, Brìghde Chaimbeul, Jiggy, Ross Ainslie & Ali Hutton, Martyn Bennett, Shooglenifty and more.

Source Folk Radio UK

Lankum’s Ian Lynch boards the Mystery Train

On a highly entertaining edition of the Mystery Train Sunday Service on RTÉ lyric fm, John Kelly was joined by Ian Lynch of Lankum for a chat and some of his favourite tunes – listen above…

The musician, folk song collector and folklore lecturer explains the epenthetic vowel and a mondegreen, and picks music by Shannon and the Clams, Portishead and Iron Maiden.

Listen to this GREAT show at: Lankum’s Ian Lynch boards the Mystery Train

‘The audience knew they were in the hands of a master’

A musical number, a chat with a Hollywood star. A debate on the ‘burning issue’ of the day followed by a poem from the woman in the third row, a wave from the man in the fourth and then something for, well, everyone in the audience.

His work ethic was legendary, at the height of his career he was producing and presenting the Late Late, as well as presenting a daily radio show on RTÉ Radio 1.

And that wasn’t all – in the 1980s, while most of the country was enjoying the last days of summer, Gaybo had already started his autumn term, presenting the Rose of Tralee live from the Dome in the Kerry capital.

Add in the ‘Calor Gas Housewife of the Year’ competition and it was no wonder he was known as ‘Uncle Gaybo’ – for some he was as familiar a presence in the home as members of their own families.

Despite his ubiquity however Gay never became complacent about his work and both his television and radio shows broke new ground.

The Gay Byrne Hour, which became the Gay Byrne Show on RTÉ Radio 1, pioneered listener engagement, with listeners writing in and later phoning Gay about the issues of the day or problems close to their hearts.

“Consumer issues, recipes for fruit cake, relationship woes – in the days before social media Gay Byrne was the conduit for all kinds of discussion and debates”

One of the show’s most memorable broadcasts featured letters inspired by the death in childbirth of teenager Anne Lovett in Granard, Co Longford, in 1984.

When news of the tragedy broke, Irish men and women from all around the country wrote to the show with their own stories of abandonment, neglect and fear, stories from the heart which were broadcast to the nation. Continue reading

Miriam Lord: How Mike Pence shat on the new carpet in Ireland’s spare room

Stoical smiles as US vice-president delivers strong endorsement of Johnson and Brexit

The hospitable hosts buttered up their important guest and made a big fuss of his family and hoped he would say nice things about them to the important people he would meet after his visit to Ireland.

And he told them they were wonderful and that he loved them. He even said a special prayer for everyone and then, just before he left, he turned around and kicked them where it hurts.

It came as a shock.

Like pulling out all the stops for a much-anticipated visitor to your home and thinking it has been a great success until somebody discovers he shat on the new carpet in the spare room, the one you bought specially for him.

US vice-president Mike Pence met President Michael D Higgins and Taoiseach Leo Varadkar on Tuesday during an official visit. His Irish hosts, up to their oxters for the last three years in Brexit worry, hoped to impress upon him Ireland’s fears about the consequences of a no-deal Brexit for the country.

He could, maybe, stick in a supportive word for us in his talks with Boris Johnson in London – his next port of call.

Pence, after all, is Irish American and wastes no opportunity to go misty-eyed about his love for the “Old Country” as he lards on his Mother Machree schtick on both sides of the Atlantic. He couldn’t praise Ireland enough on Tuesday – “deeply humbled” and “honoured” to be going to the hometown of his mother’s grandmother and so on.

Strong endorsement

But, after he said all these nice things about the “Emerald Isle” and how much his boss Donald Trump – he sent his best wishes, by the way – appreciates us and all we do to help American security in Shannon, he delivered a very strong endorsement of Boris Johnson and Brexit.

No room left for doubt. As Pence read from the autocue and Irish eyes definitely stopped smiling, it was clear he was channeling His Master’s Voice. Trump is a fan of Brexit and of Boris. Continue reading

‘I’ve relished it’: The Derry Girls talk about their platform for change

Stars of the hit show told The Big Issue what causes they’re willing to fight for in this week’s magazine as Nicola Coughlan heads to Westminster to protest Northern Ireland’s abortion laws

In 2018, TV super smash Derry Girls stopped viewers in their tracks. It showed the joyful mundanity of life that continued even during the Troubles, while telling a timeless tale of friendship between girls. The cast spoke to The Big Issue ahead of the Derry Girls series 2 premiere, and made it clear that their time between filming was certainly not wasted.

Jamie-Lee O’Donnell, who plays Michelle Mallon, told The Big Issue she has “relished” being able to use her voice to raise awareness for issues of social justice. “It is one of the perks of the job,” she said. “I am working with an abortion rights charity and on women’s sexual health rights. Abortion is still illegal in Northern Ireland and that is something we feel quite passionate about.”

Co-star Nicola Coughlan, who appears as Clare Devlin, agreed. The group were really involved with the Repeal the Eight campaign, she said, which was “an important time for Irish women – and it is still a situation in Northern Ireland”. She also felt a responsibility to champion LGBTQ charities after playing a gay character.

Louisa Harland, Orla McCool in the show, backed her up. “It is still illegal in the North to get married if you are gay. It is legal in the UK which they are part of, and it is legal in the Republic, as is abortion now. So we feel strongly about the North being recognised.

She added: “Nicola’s character Clare wouldn’t be able to get married today. That is ridiculous.”

And mental health is close to the hearts of O’Donnell and Dylan Llewellyn (who plays James Maguire). “Dealing with suicide in young people is quite close to home for me,” Llewellyn explained, adding that he wants to encourage people to address it and be made to feel comfortable expressing themselves.

O’Donnell said: “Mental health is a big issue in Derry and Northern Ireland, especially men’s mental health and suicide awareness.

“I grew up in a town where things like that and substance abuse were quite bad and still are. So I am always happy to help out if I can by using my face from acting, lending my voice. It has affected me personally and probably everyone I know in Derry.” [ . . . ]

Full Story at THE BIG ISSUE: ‘I’ve relished it’: The Derry Girls talk about their platform for change