Hinds “Spanish Bombs”

The group Hinds cover of “Spanish Bombs” was THE HOBBLEDEHOY’s favorite moment of the Song For Joe tribute. As one viewer remarked during the show, “Hinds are the Spanish bombs!”

The Clash song “Spanish Bombs” recalls the civil war that raged in Spain from 1936 to 1939.

The Hinds said in a statement: “We’ve always loved doing covers. Maybe because that’s how we started, or maybe because there are already so many great songs in the world that we wish we had written ” .

“The Clash have always been my mother’s favorite band… so it’s always nice to connect the generations through music. As Spaniards, we are not used to being ‘yelled at’ in songs, like in New York or London. The Clash wrote a song about our own civil war while honoring us. We recorded this cover on our last day in the studio, practically live. “

‘A Song For Joe: Celebrating the Birthday of Joe Strummer’ Live Stream Friday, August 21 at 8pm BST / 3pm EDT / 12pm PDT

Gates of the West & Dark Horse Records present ‘A Song For Joe: Celebrating the Birthday of Joe Strummer’ on Friday, August 21 at
8pm BST / 3pm EDT / 12pm PDT.

Taking place on Joe’s birthday, the event will honor Joe’s legacy and feature performances and testimonials by many of the former Clash front man’s friends and notable names in the music & arts community, as well as never-before-seen Joe Strummer live footage.

“To see so many musicians and artists come forward to honor Joe is really touching,” says Joe’s wife Lucinda Tait. “Community was always important to him. Whether it was playing music with friends, organizing all night campfires, or hijacking festivals, Joe was always focused on bringing people together. Even though we can’t all be in the same room together, I cannot think of a better way for us all to feel united. Joe would have loved this.”

Source: ‘A Song For Joe: Celebrating the Birthday of Joe Strummer’ Live Stream Friday, August 21 at 8pm BST / 3pm EDT / 12pm PDT — Joe Strummer

Bruce Springsteen, Lucinda Williams, Josh Homme, Beto O’Rourke, More Set for Joe Strummer Tribute Show

The A Song for Joe: Celebrating the Life of Joe Strummer livestream also features Bob Weir, Hinds, Steve Buscemi, and never-before-seen Strummer footage

Bruce Springsteen, Lucinda Williams, Queens of the Stone Age’s Josh Homme, former Texas Representative Beto O’Rourke, Bob Weir, Steve Buscemi, Hinds, and others are participating in a livestream tribute to the late Clash frontman Joe Strummer. The two-hour event—called A Song for Joe: Celebrating the Life of Joe Strummer—takes place on Strummer’s birthday (August 21) at 3 p.m. Eastern. Along with the special appearances, the livestream will feature never-before-seen live footage of Joe Strummer.

Jesse Malin (who co-produced the event with Jeff Raspe and Joe Strummer estate manager David Zonshine) will host A Song for Joe. “This tribute to Joe is not only a great way to honor him, but to also remind people how important his message is right now,” Malin said in a press release.

During A Song for Joe, viewers can make donations to the National Independent Venue Association’s Save Our Stages campaign.

Source: Bruce Springsteen, Lucinda Williams, Josh Homme, Beto O’Rourke, More Set for Joe Strummer Tribute Show

‘We had the same brain’ – how Pennie Smith turned the Clash into icons

She photographed the biggest stars. But it was the Clash she clicked with. Pennie Smith relives their first explosive US tour – and reveals how she took ‘rock’s greatest photo’

Pennie Smith was standing less than six feet away when Paul Simonon, bass-player with the Clash, smashed his guitar to pieces on stage at the Palladium in New York. She’d been on the road with the band for two weeks, photographing their first US tour, but she’d always stayed on the other side of the stage, next to lead guitarist Mick Jones.

That night, to mix it up, she switched sides and remembers Simonon suddenly spinning toward her. “He was in a really bad mood,” she says, “and that wasn’t like him.” She took a step back to get a better focus with her 35mm Pentax – and then all hell broke loose. Simonon, seething, raised his Fender Precision like an axe, turned his back to singer Joe Strummer, and brought it crashing down. “It wasn’t a choice to take the shot,” Smith says. “My finger just went off.”

The photograph immortalised Simonon’s rage in grainy black and white. It was an emotional response, he later said, to a stiff New York audience that sat all night in their seats and didn’t move. “You can’t really tell it’s Paul,” says Smith. “But I guess that’s the point.”

On the tour bus the next day, Strummer chose the image for the cover of London Calling, the 1979 album that was to prove the Clash’s masterpiece – an exuberant outcry that is still regarded as one of the greatest, most influential albums of all time. Its slick mix of punk, reggae, blues and rockabilly – with lyrics Strummer rarely bettered – has been cited by everyone from U2 to Springsteen, Nirvana to the Beastie Boys, as a seminal moment. “They’re the band that changed everything,” Chuck D recently said, revealing that Public Enemy set out to be a rap equivalent of the Clash.

‘It’s a bit of a weight around my neck’ … the album cover with Smith’s shot.
‘It’s a bit of a weight around my neck’ … the album cover with Pennie Smith’s shot. Photograph: Sony Music/Pennie Smith

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Joe Strummer’s widow tells how she found The Clash singer’s lost tapes in their Somerset barn

His work inspired devotion around the world – prompting more than one fan to tell him he had changed their lives – but for a long time after his untimely death Lucinda Tait could not bear to hear her husband’s Joe Strummer’s voice. Her grief was simply too raw and his singing only served as a cruel reminder of what she had lost.

“When Joe died I was so immersed in grief and trying to find a way to move on that I couldn’t listen to his voice. It was just too much to hear him”

So it was only in recent years that Tait could bring herself to listen to the previously unreleased recordings by the former lead singer of  The Clash which she had discovered in their Somerset barn, shortly after he died of an undiagnosed heart defect in December 2002, at the age of 50,Now 32 songs from that stash of long lost Strummer tapes have been released as part of a new collection of work by a man who inspired [ . . . ]

Continue at THE TELEGRAPH: Joe Strummer’s widow tells how she found The Clash singer’s lost tapes in their Somerset barn