Paul Hollywood: “I have missed Mary, Mel and Sue”

The Bake Off presenter admits it was hard filming the new series without the old gang

Paul Hollywood has revealed that he “missed Mary, Mel and Sue” and that filming the new series of The Great British Bake Off has been “hard” at times.

RADIOTIMES :: Bake Off left its home on BBC1 last year after it was bought by Channel 4 for £25 million. Presenters Mel and Sue decided not to “go with the dough” and follow the show to the new broadcaster, as did judge Mary Berry. However, Paul Hollywood stuck with the programme during its switch and will reprise his judging role in the new series.

“I have missed Mary, Mel and Sue,” Hollywood told Closer. “When I started filming the new Bake Off it was hard.” [ . . . ]

Full story at: Paul Hollywood: “I have missed Mary, Mel and Sue”


The Crown, Season 2: How True Is It?

It sure seems real, sumptuously produced and beautifully acted. But how much truth? How much fiction?

Season 2 of the successful Netflix series The Crown that premieres Friday, December 8,  kicks off with a taboo subject: the rumored infidelity of the British monarch’s husband, Prince Philip, with a fictional ballet dancer (which is based on rumors at the time of an affair with the actress Pat Kirkwood.)

At the same time, some biographers like Sarah Bradford in her book Queen Elizabeth II: Her Life in Our Times, present his infidelity as a fact, adding that she talked with two women who had been romantically involved with the royal consort.

The answer about how close is The Crown to the real life of the British royals, though, is very nuanced. After all, throughout its history the royal family has become quite adept at keeping secrets.

“The series is incredibly accurate and true to the history,” Robert Lacey, a historical biographer and consultant for the series who just published his new book, The Crown: The Official Companion, Volume 1: Elizabeth II, Winston Churchill and the Making of a Young Queen (1947-1955), told royal correspondent Tom Sykes. “If you go into the Left Bank offices—Left Bank being the company producing the series for Netflix—the first thing you see is a huge newsroom with eight full-time researchers working away, and that’s just the start, the raw material.” | Read More at : The Crown, Season 2: How True Is It?

Review: Thoroughly Modern ‘Victoria,’ Still Nursing That Crush

Rufus Sewell’s portrayal of Lord Melbourne was the best thing about the  the premiere episode of Masterpiece’s “Victoria.” Overall, the pacing in the episode  one was a bit weird, and the look recalls a tv perfume commercial from the ’70s, “Your Windsong® stays on my mind…” However, the growing tension/attraction between Lord M and Victoria kept it interesting. I’ll be watching part 2, but I want to see at least some heavy petting from the height-challenged queen and Lord Dreamboat by the end of the episode! Read the New York Times Review below, and as Chuck Berry sang, “Go, Go,Go! Little Queenie!” 
– Johnny Foreigner

Disney had the princess game to itself for a while, but recently there’s been some competition. From real princesses. Why resort to computer-animated Polynesian or Nordic teenagers when you can watch a tale of empowerment and agency about a young woman who actually became queen of the United Kingdom?

First, Netflix gave us “The Crown,” 10 sumptuous and slightly stuffy episodes about the woman who would become Queen Elizabeth II. Now PBS jumps back a century for “Victoria,” eight episodes about Elizabeth’s great-great-grandmother, beginning on Sunday on “Masterpiece.”

And while sumptuous still applies, stuffy is not a word that in any way describes “Victoria,” [ . . .  ] Read the full NY Times Review