Monty Python’s Michael Palin on saving theatres

Sir Michael Palin joins us to talk about how he’s working to save theatres in lockdown. The Monty Python star tells us what life in lockdown has been life for him and his family, and how he has been coping since fellow Python Terry Jones passed. Broadcast on 26/06/20

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The Best and Worst Toilets at the Edinburgh Fringe 

If going to the Fringe is a pleasure, then why is finding a decent venue toilet such a pain? It may be easier to get hold of the hottest tickets at the festival than it is to find a nice, clean, secure loo. But these toilets do exist – when we asked our readers to tell us about their best and worst Fringe toilet stories, boy, did they have stories. From colourful Fringe toilet tales involving finding used pregnancy tests, fights with men dressed as pandas, drag queens using the toilets as changing rooms (because there weren’t any in the venue), and my favourite, the person who managed a pop-up venue in what turned out to be a popular cottaging toilet – spending a penny at the Fringe is always an experience. But where should you go?

The Best

According to the survey respondents, some of the Fringe’s best toilets can be found at Gilded Balloon; both Teviot Row House and Rose Theatre, which were praised for being ‘clean, bright and fragrant’.

Other fan favourites were Underbelly Cowgate, Traverse, Pleasance Dome and Assembly Rooms, which were described by one person as ‘pretty swish’.

The Worst

Regular visitors to the Fringe may not be surprised to learn that when it comes to toilets, Summerhall’s offerings proved to be very unpopular. For not having enough toilets, to queues, cleanliness, lack of soap and toilet paper, Summerhall’s bathrooms were. Runners-up were Assembly George Square, Pleasance Courtyard and The Hive for the same reasons [ . . . ]

Continue this story at THE SKINNY: The Best and Worst Toilets at the Edinburgh Fringe: The Skinny