The Accident review – echoes of Grenfell in devastating disaster drama

Sarah Lancashire stars in Jack Thorne’s sweeping, harrowing look at how the aftershock of a disaster ripples out into people’s lives

Apart from the explosion, The Accident (Channel 4) is very quiet. Hairdresser Polly (Sarah Lancashire) doesn’t even shout when she finds her 15-year-old daughter Leona’s latest one-night stand still in her bedroom. She just flings his clothes at him, notes that Leona (Jade Croot) is underage and that he looks 28, and makes him jump out of the window. Then she takes herself off to the local charity run with her friends. They are walking, Polly’s best friend, Angela (Joanna Scanlan), says firmly.

So begins the new four-part drama by Jack Thorne, the unassailable powerhouse behind the likes of This is England, Skins, Kiri (in which Lancashire also starred) and the forthcoming adaptation of Philip Pullman’s fantasy trilogy, His Dark Materials. […] Continue reading

“Movie review: “The Invisible Man”

Available to rent early due to its premature departure from cinemas amid the COVID-19 outbreak, Leigh Whannell’s take on this classic story is deeply satisfying, despite the odd flaw

Leigh Whannell’s take on the iconic H.G. Wells monster and 1933 Pre-Code horror finally sees the light of day after 13 years in development, and the results are surprisingly satisfying. In San Francisco’s present-day haven of technology start-ups and 30-something millionaires, Cecilia (Elizabeth Moss) is first seen painstakingly sneaking out of the gated mansion she shares with her husband Adrian (Oliver Jackson-Cohen). Two weeks after this heart-poundingly narrow escape, Adrian is dead of an apparent suicide – and yet Cecilia cannot shake the feeling that he is just around the corner.

Movie Review: Sorry We Missed You

Ken Loach eviscerates the gig economy in this vérité masterpiece

With all the discussion over the last decade(s) about how the one percent are cast as these nefarious villains in their high castles, scoffing at and exploiting us mere plebeians attempting to survive in this increasing problematic era of capitalism, it is (dis)comforting to know that the tradition of documenting stories of the working class among filmmakers has found many new topics to discuss in their narratives. Mike Leigh, the Dardenne brothers, and of course, Ken Loach are delving into very intricate and humanistic stories that succinctly deconstruct the world of people ever on the verge of losing it, walking that razor’s edge of some sort of viable financial stability. Continue reading