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Rest in Peace, Terry Jones (1 February 1942 – 21 January 2020)

Neil Innes death: Monty Python and The Rutles star dies aged 75 

 

Comedian and musician Neil Innes, who collaborated with Monty Python and played with The Rutles, has died aged 75, his agent has said.

Essex-born Innes wrote music for Monty Python’s albums including Monty Python’s Previous Record and The Monty Python Matching Tie and Handkerchief, after becoming involved with the comedy group in the 1970s.

He appeared in the 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail as a head-bashing monk, the serf crushed by the giant wooden rabbit, and the leader of Sir Robin’s minstrels. He also had small roles in Terry Gilliam’s Jabberwocky and Monty Python’s Life of Brian.

Innes is said to have provided the famous whistling on “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life”.​

Source: Neil Innes death: Monty Python and The Rutles star dies aged 75 | The Independent

“Monty Python’s Flying Circus” celebrates 50th anniversary

Fifty years ago today, the groundbreaking British sketch series “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” premiered on the U.K.’s BBC One and forever changed the world of comedy. The troupe’s absurd humor was a subversive poke in the eye to buttoned-up British society. Sketches like the “Ministry of Silly Walks,” “The Spanish Inquisition,” and “The Dead Parrot” became comedy classics. Dana Jacobson reports.

Source: “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” celebrates 50th anniversary – CBS News

Terry Gilliam says he disagrees with John Cleese’s worldview

Director says Brexit makes him ‘terminally depressed’ while fellow Python Cleese backs it

Terry Gilliam has said he disagrees with the way his friend and fellow Monty Python member John Cleese sees the world, following comments from the latter endorsing Brexit and criticising the makeup of London.

The Python animator and Hollywood director despairs of Donald Trump and Brexit, both of which make him “terminally depressed”. Cleese has previously faced a backlash for voicing support for the UK leaving the EU, and for saying London was no longer an English city.

Gilliam told Radio Times that the only public figure he could trust in the current political climate was Sir David Attenborough. He also criticised the political correctness of contemporary comedy, but stopped short of supporting his friend’s view of the world.

He said: “I’m the instinctive, monosyllabic American and he’s the tall, very suave one. I love John enormously but I just disagree with the way he perceives the world.” Continue reading