Camra: more than half of UK adults struggle to afford to drink in pubs

More than half of adults in the UK are struggling to afford to drink in pubs, according to the Campaign for Real Ale

The average price of a pint of beer in London is now £5.20 and regularly tops £6. Across the country, the average is about £3.50, leading to many drinkers staying at home with cans of beer bought in supermarkets instead, said Camra, which warned that more than a dozen pubs a week were closing as a result.It said its research found that 56% of drinkers believe the price of a pint of beer in a pub in the UK has become unaffordable.Prices have risen steeply in recent years, with various taxes including beer duty, business rates and VAT accounting for a third of the cost, said Camra.

The most expensive places for a pint outside London are Oxford (£4.57), Edinburgh and Bristol (£4.35), and Brighton (£4.24). The cheapest is Carlisle £2.35, which is two-thirds of the UK average.

Craft beer in supermarkets costs about £1.50 per bottle or can (330ml) and while mass-produced lager and bitters averages less than £1.

Camra is concerned that the government is planning to increase the tax paid by pubs in the November budget. Beer duty is to rise by about 2p per pint under Treasury plans, and small pubs are to lose the £1,000 in business rate relief introduced in 2017, but scheduled to end in 2019. [ . . . ]

Continue reading at THE GUARDIAN: Camra: more than half of UK adults struggle to afford to drink in pubs | Money | The Guardian

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Trappist ales: why monks have always brewed beer

What’s the historic connection between abbeys and brewing?

Monks in Leicestershire are brewing up a storm, the first batch of a new Trappist ale. The monks of the Mount Saint Bernard abbey have revived the craft of brewing beer. But, how far back does the tradition go in the UK? Helen Castor spoke to the beer historian Martyn Cornell to discover a tradition that goes back for centuries before the Reformation, when beer was given as hospitality but also drunk by the monks themselves who needed something nutritious to quench their thirst when working hard in the fields or in workshops around their Abbey.

Listen at: BBC Radio 4 – Radio 4 in Four, Trappist ales: why monks have always brewed beer

Holborn Dining Room: ‘Its pork pie is a bold expression of pig’

If you come here and don’t order a pie, you’ll only have yourself to blame. Don’t let me down, says Jay Rayner

My late mother had no truck with religious observance. She preferred cultural signifiers of her Jewishness like a full fridge, a belief in the utilitarian qualities of cake liberally applied and a hatred of silence at the table. There was, however, one way in which she observed Jewish religious ritual, though she was utterly bewildered when I pointed it out to her. She liked to cook gefilte fish, that sustaining mix of ground white fish, bound with matzo meal and sweetened with sugar. It comes in two forms. There is the boiled, served cold with its own fishy jelly, an abomination I always regarded as the closest food could come to cruel and unusual punishment. And then there is the fried, which is a different matter altogether. It should be crisp and golden outside and light and fluffy inside. Cooking them made the house smell of indulgence. I would watch them being lifted from the oil with a slotted spoon to the rack to cool a little. At which point I would try to take one and would have my hand verbally slapped away. “Not until they’re cold.”

I was baffled. Eventually I became old enough to do a bit of reading and investigation. Gefilte fish is food for the Sabbath, when no work can be done. They are to be cooked in advance, so the family has something ready for after sundown. Hence, by necessity they are served cold. My mother, who saw religious dogma (rightly) as the cause of so much suffering, had carried one small piece of it into her kitchen, from her adored grandmother’s. When I pointed this out, she was horrified. She let me eat one hot. God, it was good: the just-fried shell, yielding beneath my teeth, giving way to gusts of hot, sweet fishy steam and soft white flesh. Oy, and as I believe some people still say, Vey.

In what I recognise may be one of the greatest dietary non-sequiturs of all time, I have long felt the same way about pork pies. I bloody love a pork pie. All culinary traditions have a way of using up bits of animal that might otherwise go to waste, and the pork pie is one of our noblest. I love the interplay of crisp, animal fat-boosted hot water pastry, the dense meaty filling, punched up with white pepper, and then the jelly, reintroduced back to the tight cavities from which it has leaked during cooking. The thing is, I have always wondered how marvellous one would be straight out of the oven.

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Continue this wonderful restaurant review at THE GUARDIAN : Holborn Dining Room: ‘Its pork pie is a bold expression of pig’ – restaurant review | Life and style | The Guardian

Spennymoor’s Frog & Ferret Pub is for sale

The frog and ferret pub is well established country drinking house situated on the outskirts of Spennymoor. A full refurbishment was undertaken by the current owner 2 years ago including new tables and chairs, a brand new industrial kitchen that fully complies with the all legislation. A brand new inside and out CCTV security system and 3 flat screen TV’s mounted throughout the bar.   The property has a fully refurbished upstairs 4 bedroom flat including new kitchen, new bathroom dining room and large living room, all with new carpets throughout.   The pub currently revenues £3,000 – £4000 a week on wet sales.   The owner is looking to sell the business and property for £163,000, or would consider putting in a new live in tenant under a contract basis where rent would be payable at a monthly rate of £1475 net.

Source: County Durham Spennymoor: Frog & Ferret – MorningAdvertiser

The BEST pubs in Britain revealed at prestigious awards with White Horse Chilgrove taking top prize

The National Pub & Bar Awards winners were announced on Wednesday night, with The White Horse in Chilgrove, which hosts shooting parties, taking the crown of best pub in the UK.

You’ll find one in every village, town and city in the UK, and now the nation’s best pubs have been crowned at a prestigious awards ceremony.

Though many still think of smoky ‘old man’ boozers when they hear the word pub, the regional winners at the The National Pub & Bar Awards 2018 organised by Pub & Bar magazine are modern yet cosy, chic, and stand out from the crowd with unusual decor or innovative menus.

The overall winner, The White House, in Chilgrove, could not be more different from the type of public house you might see on Coronation Street or Eastenders, as the West Sussex inn has been described as a modern ‘quintessential shooting lodge’.

Situated next to the Goodwood estate, it offers guests a £225 shooting party package and boasts a ‘field to fork’ menu. [ . . . ]

Read more at DAILY MAIL: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/food/article-5766381/The-BEST-pubs-Britain-revealed-prestigious-awards-White-Horse-Chilgrove-taking-prize.html#ixzz5GRQzEYvU