Kermode & Mayo Film Reviews: Parasite, more

Film reviews including Robert Downey Junior in Dolittle, Margot Robbie in Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn and Kristen Stewart in Underwater.

Mark and Simon chat through all the films worth seeing in UK cinemas in the UK Box Office Top Ten, we tell you the best and worst films on TV next week and recommend a home entertainment purchase in DVD of the Week.

00:27:55 Box Office Top 10
00:44:33 Bong Joon Ho Interview
00:59:51 Parasite Review
01:11:20 Dolittle Review
01:20:26 Underwater Review
01:25:19 Plus One Review
01:35:19 Daniel Isn’t Real Review
01:41:33 Birds of Prey Review
01:45:09 Mr Jones Review

Lisa O’Neil on The Music Show

Lisa O’Neil

Lisa O’Neillis a singer, songwriter and musician from County Cavan. Her latest album, Heard A Long Gone Song, is filled with characters, stories and traditional songs from her native Ireland.

These stories range from the life of Violet Gibson, an Irish woman who tried to assassinate Mussolini in 1926, to the dockland workers who lost their jobs to mechanisation in the 1950s and 60s.

The instrumentation on the record is sparse, which allows more room for her mighty voice.

Music played in this interview

Title: The Lass of Aughrim
Artist: Lisa O’Neill
Album: Heard A Long Gone Song
Comp: trad.
Label: River Lea
Cat. No.: RLR001CD
Dur: 2.12

Title: Rock The Machine
Artist: Lisa O’Neill
Album: Heard A Long Gone Song
Comp: O’Neill
Label: River Lea
Cat. No.: RLR001CD
Dur: 5.16

Producer Ellie Parnell

Heard A Long Gone Song is Lisa O’Neill’s fourth album, and the first to be released on Rough Trade Record’s new traditional folk imprint River Lea that releases “beautiful and strange traditional music from Britain, Ireland and beyond.”

Joe Boyd on “Liege and Lief”

Klipsch Audio presented Classic Album Sundays at Bestival 2014, where Joe Boyd discussed the album “Liege and Lief” by Fairport Convention using Klipsch La Scala speakers. Boyd is a record producer and writer who formerly owned Witchseason production company and Hannibal Records. His impact on the recording careers of some of the world’s greatest bands is immeasurable.

Guitar man: An interview with Richard Thompson

Groundbreaking British DJ John Peel once called him “the best kept-secret in the world of music,” but Richard Thompson has been flatpicking raging guitar solos for more than 50 years.

FEBRUARY 2018

Groundbreaking British DJ John Peel once called him “the best kept-secret in the world of music,” but Richard Thompson has been flatpicking raging guitar solos for more than 50 years. He burst onto London’s swinging music scene in 1967 as the teenage singer and guitarist for Fairport Convention, the seminal folk-rock band that married traditional English songs with an infectious rock groove. In the ’70s, he began singing hypnotic duets in harmony with his then-wife Linda; their best-known album, I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight, was released in 1974.

In the early ’80s, the singer-songwriter went solo and has regularly put out albums ever since. Though he remains relatively under the radar, the press takes regular notice of him: In 2011, Time magazine listed his 1991 fingerpicking masterpiece “1952 Vincent Black Lightning” as one of their All-TIME 100 Songs, and in 2015, Rolling Stone put him at #69 on their list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists. He was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 2011 for his musical contributions.

Last September, he released 13 Rivers, his 18th solo album. It features 13 thundering, mostly minor-key songs that Thompson vaguely describes as having been written during a dark time in his life. He brings the Richard Thompson Electric Trio, with drummer Michael Jerome and bassist Taras Prodaniuk, to the Lensic Performing Arts Center on Thursday, Feb. 14. Pasatiempo reached him by phone at his rented house in New Jersey, where he was resting up in advance of his 2019 tour.

Pasatiempo: The songs on your new album have been described as having a “grim urgency” and an “unflinching gaze,” which could also characterize much of your songwriting over your career. In the first verse of the opener, “Storm Won’t Come,” you sing, “I’m longing for a storm to blow through town/And blow these sad old buildings down/Fire to burn what fire may/And rain to wash it all away.” Are these songs for troubled times, or is this just business as usual for you?

Richard Thompson: It’s not that bad if you really listen to it. [laughs] I don’t think I’ve written literally about anything. I’ve been in this parallel world of song fiction. I’m sure all these traumas that my son has been through are reflected in there.

Continue reading