The best films set in London to watch at home

As we all prepare to self-isolate, Luxury London picks some of our favourite, era-defining films set in the capital. Predictably, Richard Curtis and Hugh Grant clear up 

Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998)

“You could choke a dozen donkeys on that! And you’re haggling over one hundred pound? What d’you do when you’re not buying stereos, Nick? Finance revolutions?”

Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, Guy Ritchie’s first and finest feature film, just gets better with age. A sharp, stylish insight into London’s gritty underworld, the film made a household name of its director and kick-started the acting careers of ex-driver Jason Statham and a former footballer by the name by Vinnie Jones – who proved he could be just as intimidating on screen as he was on the pitch. Witty, pacey and packed full of poster-worthy one-liners – “If the milk turns out to be sour, I ain’t the kind of pussy to drink it. You know what I mean, Nick?” – Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels is the best British gangster flick of the past quarter-century – know what I mean, Nick?

Chosen by Richard Brown, editorial director

About a Boy (2002)

Having invented a son to impress single mum Rachel (Rachel Weisz), wealthy bachelor Will Freeman (Hugh Grant) faces a conundrum when she invites him, and his fictional child Ned, to a playdate. Enlisting the help of misfit teenager Marcus (Nicholas Holt), Will unwittingly enters into a relationship that forms the basis of this coming-of-age tale, which touches on themes of friendship, suicide and teenage anxiety. In Nick Hornby’s original novel, the story is set in Islington, but the film adaptation is shot across the capital, with Will’s apartment located in Clerkenwell, his local supermarket in Richmond, his hair salon in Westbourne Grove and his favourite restaurants (Otto Dining Lounge and Hakkasan) in Maida Vale and Hanway Place respectively. And let’s not forget Regent’s Park, the scene of Marcus’s accidental crime involving a duck and a stale loaf of bread…

Chosen by Ellen Millard, deputy editor 

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Mostly British film fest in SF celebrates ‘My Generation’ and  ‘Four Weddings’

2019 Mostly British film fest in S.F. features an anniversary “Four Weddings and a Funeral” party and screening.

Are you a big fan of the Hugh Grant-Andie MacDowell romantic charmer “Four Weddings and a Funeral”? If so, RSVP pronto and come out to toast the 25th anniversary of Mike Newell’s film.

The Feb. 16 champagne and cookies reception is part of the Mostly British Film Festival, an annual celebration of films from Britain, Ireland, Australia, India and South Africa. The “Wedding” party pops its cork at  5:30 p.m. at the Laureate Bar and Lounge, 444 Presidio Ave., in San Francisco, and is followed by a 6 p.m. screening of the romantic comedy classic at the Vogue Theatre

This year’s fest bubbles over with many worthwhile films, including the entertaining documentary “My Generation.” Michael Caine serves as a welcoming narrator and guide through David Batty’s colorful first-person accounts of the rebellious ’60s in England. Roger Daltrey, Paul McCartney and Twiggy are a few of the featured celebs recalling that raucous and creative period. It screens 3:45 p.m. Feb. 16 at the Vogue

Source: Mostly British film fest in SF celebrates ‘Four Weddings’

Four Weddings and a Funeral sequel set for Red Nose Day

Original cast to reunite for short film directed by Mike Newell and scripted by Richard Curtis, 25 years after release of groundbreaking comedy

Hugh Grant, Andie MacDowell, Kristin Scott Thomas and Rowan Atkinson are among the stars confirmed to take part in a short Four Weddings and a Funeral sequel to be screened in the UK on Red Nose Day 2019.

The film, which will be directed by the original’s Mike Newell, and scripted by original screenwriter Richard Curtis, takes place 25 years after the events of the original and features yet more nuptials.

Says Curtis: “We’re all definitely older – I suspect no wiser. It’s been really enjoyable working out what’s happened to all the characters – and now they get back together for the fifth wedding. Where, as usual, not everything will go as planned.”

Continue reading at THE GUARDIAN: Four Weddings and a Funeral sequel set for Red Nose Day | Film | The Guardian

Is it just me? I thought Love Actually was rubbish

The top five Christmas movies to boost your festive spirit

We get it, Christmas can be stressful. Even the most organized of people can feel overwhelmed – and when your to-do list is longer than your arm, it can be difficult to get into the Christmas spirit. The solution? You need a night at home, glass of mulled wine in hand, and a Christmas movie on the TV…Despite the fact that British film Love Actually was never really supposed to be a Christmas movie (find out more about that here), it’s become tradition to watch it every time December rolls around (or November, depending on how festive you’re feeling). Featuring eight or nine subplots, a brilliant soundtrack and a host of respected actors, the pressure of a big budget means it could easily have been a disaster. Instead, it turned out to be 136 minutes of uplifting, heart-warming soppiness. We love it.

Is it just me? I thought Love Actually sucked. What do you think?

Read the fully story: The top five Christmas movies to boost your festive spirit