A day late but… here’s a St. Patrick’s Day music special

00:00 Skipper’s Alley – The Farmer’s Curst Wife
03:40 Breabach – Proud to Play a Pipe
10:18 Mick Hanly & Mícheál O Dhomhnaill – An Bothán A Bhaigh Fionnghuala
12:12 The Bonny Men – Jenny’s Welcome To Charlie
17:06 The Deadlians – I don’t wanna ride yer aul one anymore.
19:46 The Spook of the Thirteenth Lock – Suffer the Wait
24:15 Trembling Bells – The Auld Triangle
30:05 Declan O’Rourke – Indian Meal
33:25 Ensemble Ériu – Gleann na Réimsí
39:17 Joe Heaney – Singing in Connemara (Extract)
39:43 Lisa O’Neill – As I Roved Out
44:24 Ye Vagabonds – When We Were Trees
46:35 Brìghde Chaimbeul – Mary Breenan’s / The Reeling, The Reeling
49:49 Croft No. Five – Track 1
55:07 Breda Smyth – Bachelor’s Walk
59:07 Shooglenifty – Samhla Reel / Scolpaig
01:05:19 Ross Ainslie, Ali Hutton – Action
01:09:24 Jiggy – Ócam an Phríosúin
01:13:04 Martin Low / Martyn Bennett – This Sky Thunders

Despite being a St Patrick’s Day special, there’s also a nice mix of Scottish artists included – we even start in a well known fictional pub on a Hebridean island – Summerisle.

Featuring Skipper’s Alley, Breabach, The Bonny Men, The Spook of the Thirteenth Lock, The Deadlians, Trembling Bells (ft. Alasdair Roberts, Ricky Ross, Dan Haywood, Mike Heron, Scott Fagan and Amy Cutler), Declan O’Rourke, Ensemble Ériu, Lisa O’Neill, Joe Heaney, Ye Vagabonds, Brìghde Chaimbeul, Jiggy, Ross Ainslie & Ali Hutton, Martyn Bennett, Shooglenifty and more.

Source Folk Radio UK

Folk Radio: Episode 70 

Featuring music from Sam Carter, Salt House, Sam Sweeney, Julie Abbé, Georgia Ruth, SIAN, Dick Gaughan, The Boys of the Lough & lots more.

Music Played

00:00 The Bonny Men – An tSean Bhean Bhocht
02:45 Sam Carter – The Forge
06:07 Sweeney’s Men – Johnson
09:35 Ye Vagabonds – The Hare’s Lament
14:29 Paddy Keenan And Tommy O’Sullivan – Reels: Collier’s / The Woman Of The House
17:57 Riley Baugus – Train On The Island
20:59 Clarence Ashley – Dark Holler Blues
25:38 Spence Moore and Roy Birns – Jimmy Sutton
28:13 The Boys of the Lough – General Guinness
30:55 The Ian Campbell Folk Group – The Unquiet Grave
32:36 Dick Gaughan – Banks of Green Willow
38:44 Julie Abbé – A Poet to His Beloved
41:09 Dana Anastasia – Cassiopeia
45:39 Sam Sweeney – Highway To Warrington
50:22 Salt House – All Shall Be Still
55:12 Georgia Ruth – Madryn
57:52 Sian – Bha Mo Leannan Ann
01:01:48 Fidil – The Fantastic Reel / Mhúineál A’ Bhardáil / The Merry Sisters
01:05:29 Martin Carthy with Dave Swarbrick – Domeama

 

This week’s Folk Show features, alongside some new and forthcoming releases, a dip into the past. We go back to the 1960s and 70s courtesy of Sweeny’s MenClarence AshleySpence Moore and Roy BirnsThe Boys of the LoughThe Ian Campbell Folk Group and Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick, several recordings are from old vinyl releases. Plus some favourites from Ye Vagabonds, Dick Gaughan and the incredible Paddy Keenan & Tommy O’Sullivan. Continue reading

Lost in Transmission: Ep 53

by Alex Gallacher / FOLK RADIO UK 7 February, 2020


An extra-long show this week featuring new releases from Ned Roberts, Bronwynne Brent, Citizen Bravo (ft. Karine Polwart),  Tami Neilson, Terry Allen & The Panhandle Mystery Band, Matt McGinn, The Bonny Men, Troda, Alden Patterson and Dashwood, Bonny Light Horseman, Sam Lee, Sallows, Dàibhidh Stiùbhard, John Blek, Jeffrey Foucault, Fierce Flowers, Secret Sisters, Arborist and lots more.

Music Played

00:00 Ned Roberts – Wrong Side Of You
02:59 Bronwynne Brent – Big Talker
05:49 Citizen Bravo, Raymond MacDonald and Friends, Karine Polwart – Pickle Your Knees
07:25 Nick Cave – Sure Nuff N Yes I Do
09:59 Agnostic Mountain Gospel Choir – Never Be Dead
12:18 Tami Neilson – Ten Tonne Truck
14:36 Marlon Williams – Hello Miss Lonesome
17:45 Mikhael Paskalev – I Spy
20:20 Sean Hayes – Little Maggie
23:47 Tragedy Ann – Neon & Velour
27:04 Terry Allen & The Panhandle Mystery Band – Houdini Didn’t Like The Spiritualists (Featuring Shannon McNally)
31:03 Matt McGinn – Child of War
34:39 The Bonny Men – Jenny’s Welcome To Charlie
39:32 Troda – El Dorado’s
43:19 Alden Patterson and Dashwood – The Dyeing Room
45:28 Bonny Light Horseman – Magpie’s Nest
50:15 Sam Lee – Worthy Wood
54:13 Sallows – Old Man
58:06 Dàibhidh Stiùbhard – The Stately Woods of Truagh
01:03:12 John Blek – Flame (Little Death No3)
01:06:37 Jeffrey Foucault – Blown
01:09:23 Fierce Flowers – Tell Me Lies
01:13:07 The Secret Sisters – Tin Can Angel
01:17:27 Arborist – From the Sagging Bough of a Maple
01:22:21 Moriarty – Enjoy the Silence
01:24:16 Hazel Dickens & Alice Gerrard – No Hard Times
01:27:17 Lesley Riddle – John Henry
01:29:37 Otis Taylor – My Soul’s in Louisiana

SOURCE: Folk Radio UK https://www.folkradio.co.uk/2020/02/lost-in-transmission-53/

Cambridge Folk Festival 2019: Our Team Picks 

Three of the Folk Radio UK that are heading to Cherry Hinton Hall for Cambridge Folk Festival this year tell us their top must-see acts.

Three of the Folk Radio UK team will soon be heading to Cherry Hinton Hall for this year’s Cambridge Folk Festival (1-4 August 2019). Below, you can read about the top five acts that they are each most looking forward to seeing. Between them, they came up with a great selection of acts – no easy task considering the vast lineup.

Danny Neil

Two of my eagerly anticipated appearances at this year’s festival were responsible for my favourite albums in 2018. Lisa O’Neill’s ‘Heard A Long Gone Song’ was a revelation, a record on the Rough Trade imprint River Lea mixing up traditional and original material. Her voice just sounds so lived in; an instrument that was tailor-made to interpret hardcore folk songs. She’s as serious a proposition as I’d imagine Anne Briggs was when making a name for herself in the sixties clubs and whilst Lisa may not possess Anne’s high-ranging purity of tone, her strength of character alone more than makes up for this and to misquote Dylan she “hits all those notes”. This artist is the real deal without a doubt. At ten years and four albums in I’m arriving a little late to the Lisa O’Neill party, still in the world of traditional leaning folk she is my must-see artist of the year and I absolutely cannot wait for this one.

By contrast, it seems to be rather stating the obvious to recommend a legend like Richard Thompson, but nevertheless, that’s exactly what I’m doing. And I continue to, telling anyone I know attending this year that whatever they do, they must not miss this man. Personally, I have seen him more times than I can recall, but he never lets an audience down. I’m entertaining the thought that it’s high time an appreciation is written for the last twenty years of his career alone, there’s a strong argument they’ve seen Thompson’s strongest writing and greatest performances. There aren’t too many 70-year-old music artists you can legitimately make that claim for.

 

Nick Mulvey is this year’s guest curator, an inspiring choice given the wide-ranging, multi-genre sounds he weaves into his music. Nick’s is an acoustic pop style that avoids the box-ticking pitfalls that hit-seeking mainstream troubadours fall down. Instead, he has the happy knack of whipping up the feel-good vibes that should find a warm reception amongst a chilled festival crowd. I also find Tunng to be a mouth-watering prospect having last caught them at a folk festival thirteen years ago when their folktronica wizardry was still in its embryonic stage. Theirs has been a musical evolution that continues to fascinate, for me a band who reward returning investigations. And on that subject, it’s vital to try out a bit of the unknown at any festival and open yourself up to exciting discoveries. If I were to choose an act on the curiosity of name alone it has to be The Bar-Steward Sons Of Val Doonican. Of course, that one could go badly wrong, but half the fun is in the finding out! [ . . . ]

Continue at: Cambridge Folk Festival 2019: Our Team Picks | Folk Radio

Lisa O’Neill: Artist of the Month Interview | Folk Radio

Lisa O’Neill’s remarkable fourth album, Heard a Long Gone Song is a work that commands attention. As honest and creative as it is arresting; her mix of collected and self-written, traditional and contemporary song has earned high praise, and justifiably so. With the influence of traditional song stronger than in any of her previous albums, both in terms of content and approach, it’s not so much a change in direction for the County Cavan artist, it’s an entirely relevant exploration of the background to her music [ . . . ]

Continue at FRUK: Lisa O’Neill: Artist of the Month Interview | Folk Radio