A terrifying ride with Stephen King’s ‘Mr. Mercedes’

By Isaac Feldberg | Boston Globe

While Stephen King is unparalleled in his ability to conjure blood-curdling boogeymen from the furthest reaches of his imagination (see: the demonic Pennywise of “IT,” the vampires of “’Salem’s Lot”), the macabre master is often just as terrifying when he turns his attention to more mortal monsters.

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Trump card: Can Brendan Gleeson pull off playing Trump in new TV series The Comey Rule?

In early trailers for the controversial new TV mini-series The Comey Rule, Brendan Gleeson looks uncannily like the 45th US President, swaggering around in enormous suits, his skin a day-glow orange, his hair whisked into a gravity-defying quiff.

In early trailers for the controversial new TV mini-series The Comey Rule, Brendan Gleeson looks uncannily like the 45th US President, swaggering around in enormous suits, his skin a day-glow orange, his hair whisked into a gravity-defying quiff.

He’s well-cast as Donald Trump, the same height (6ft 2in), and with a similarly imposing physique. But on the basis of a 10-second trailer, there have already been criticisms of his vocal approach: he delivers lines in a muttering growl, which some have complained is insufficiently Trumpian.

Gleeson is a wily and intelligent actor and, before taking on this role, will have wrestled with a difficult question: how do you play perhaps the most impersonated man on the planet? It started with Alec Baldwin’s clownish turns on Saturday Night Live, and now everyone has a Trump impression. To get beyond the caricature and embody the man himself, Gleeson would have to ditch the well-worn tics and come up with something new. No doubt he has.

The drama, based on former FBI chief James Comey’s memoir and due to be screened in September, is unlikely to be flattering: Comey (who’s played by Jeff Daniels) was fired by Trump in May, 2017 on foot of the investigation into Russian involvement in the 2016 Presidential election; his distaste for his former boss is well known.

Brendan Gleeson transforms into Donald Trump in the first teaser for TV drama The Comey Rule

Brendan Gleeson transforms into Donald Trump in the first teaser for TV drama The Comey Rule

Source: Trump card: Can Brendan Gleeson pull off playing The Donald in new TV series The Comey Rule?

10 Best British Gangster Movies Ever

The Hobbledehoy notes the omission of 1997’s absolutely marvelous  gangster flick I Went Down directed by Paddy Breathnach and starring Brendan Gleeson, Peter McDonald and Michael McElhatton.

True, I Went Down is Irish not British, but the same can be said for In Bruges, which is on this Top 10 list. But who cares about rules anyway? Certainly not gangsters!

Nobody does gangster movies quite like the Brits, eh? The origins of the British crime thriller go back almost 75 years, though the genre truly picked up speed in the late 1960s, with the following three decades in particular serving up a slew of quintessential British gangster romps.

From comedy-laced capers to more serious, unexpectedly character-driven thrillers, these are the ten most influential genre entries that have been copied, parodied and homaged over the years – often successfully, but more often not – and set the groundwork for an entire film industry in of itself.

See all 10 movies at: 10 Best British Gangster Movies Ever

 

Jack Bender on Mr. Mercedes, Working with Stephen King | Collider

Based on the best-selling novel by Stephen King and executive produced by David E. Kelley and Jack Bender, the Audience Network drama series Mr. Mercedes follows a retired police detective (Brendan Gleeson) who is being taunted by a demented serial killer (Harry Treadaway). After a series of taunting letters and emails, Detective Hodges decides to undertake a crusade to bring the killer to justice before he can strike again.

While at the Audience Network portion of the Television Critics Association Press Tour, Collider got the opportunity to sit down with director Jack Bender to talk about how Mr. Mercedes came about, his friendship with Stephen King, how David E. Kelley got involved, keeping the focus on the characters, shaping the look and feel of the series, deciding how to handle that horrific car sequence, and wanting to do two more seasons, to cover the second and third book. He also talked about whether he might return to direct [ . . . ] More at: Jack Bender on Mr. Mercedes, Working with Stephen King | Collider