Michael Caine on how the 1960s broke class barriers: ‘I’ve met lots of equals. No betters’

As a schoolboy, Michael Caine, the son of a charlady and a fish-market porter, was repeatedly taught to respect “his betters”. It took the social revolution of the 1960s, he says, to make it clear that such a hierarchy did not exist. “I’ve met lots of my equals since. But no betters,” Caine told the Observer this weekend on the eve of the British premiere of his documentary about the outpouring of working-class creativity in the 1960s.

“True, there was a lot of new music and great actors, as well as books and film directors and some dancing in discos, but it was a lot more than that: it was a change in the social lives of young people,” he said.Michael Caine: ‘I voted Brexit. It was about freedom, not immigrants’ | Read more: Michael Caine on how the 1960s broke class barriers: ‘I’ve met lots of equals. No betters’ | Film | The Guardian

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