‘He can’t lie’: the uncompromising brilliance of Paddy Considine

 


The world premiere of a new play written by Jerusalem’s Jez Butterworth and directed by Sam Mendes was always going to be big news, so it’s no surprise that The Ferryman, a brooding tale of buried secrets set in rural
Derry in the early 1980s, has become the fastest-selling show in the history of the Royal Court in London.

But the most enticing prospect will arguably be the chance to see one of British cinema’s bravest actors, the 43-year-old Paddy Considine in his stage debut.

It has been almost 20 years since cinemagoers first got an idea of what a performance by Considine might entail: tenderness and volatility shot through with sweet-and-salty humour.

That was in 1999, in A Room for Romeo Brass, written and directed by his old college pal and indie bandmate Shane Meadows

[ . . . ] More at source: ‘He can’t lie’: the uncompromising brilliance of Paddy Considine | Stage | The Guardian

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