PJ Harvey Will Score Ivo Van Hove’s Stage Adaptation of All About Eve

“50 Ft. Queenie” should fit right in.

All About Eve will be adapted for the stage next year—and who better to score this tale of jealous rage and desperation than the musician Rolling Stone held responsible for “digging out her most twisted nightmares and setting them on fire”? (This review came in tribute to PJ Harvey’s 1993 album Rid of Me, a goth-punk album praised by Kurt Cobain and Elvis Costello.) More recently, Harvey scored two documentaries, Ukrajina and Towards Mathilde, and one play, The Nest, which premiered in 2016. An announcement released Monday morning on Harvey’s website confirmed that she will be scoring the stage rendition of the acclaimed film.

A 1950s classic and Best Picture Oscar–winner, All About Eve follows Bette Davis in the role of a fading Broadway star and Anne Baxter as the starry-eyed young fan threatening to replace her. The film is also famous for featuring the glowing charisma of Marilyn Monroe in a smaller part that manages to steal the spotlight.

The play will be directed by acclaimed Belgian theater director Ivo Van Hove and will run from February through May of 2019 at London’s Noël Coward Theatre. Gillian Anderson will take on Davis’ part and Lily James (from Baby Driver) will play Anne Baxter’s Eve.

Source: PJ Harvey Will Score Ivo Van Hove’s Stage Adaptation of All About Eve

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Nick Cave, PJ Harvey & Henry Lee

 

“Fucking hell! That’s a one-take video,” Nick Cave said about the decades-old but still smokin’ hot collaboration with PJ Harvey.

“Nothing is rehearsed at all except we sit on this ‘love seat’. We didn’t know each other well, and this thing happens while we’re making the video. There’s a certain awkwardness, and afterwards it’s like, oh…” Asked if he was actually beginning his brief romance with Harvey in this three-minute video, Cave confirmed, “Yeah, exactly.”

“Henry Lee” (aka “Young Hunting”) is a traditional folk song catalogued by Francis James Child as Child Ballad and has its origin in Scotland.

Like most traditional songs, numerous variants of the song exist worldwide, notably under the title of “Henry Lee” and “Love Henry” in the United States and “Earl Richard” and sometimes “The Proud Girl” in the United Kingdom.
The song, which can be traced back as far as the 18th century, narrates the tale of the eponymous protagonist, Young Hunting, who tells a woman, who may have borne him a child, that he is in love with another, more beautiful woman. Despite this, she persuades him to drink until he is drunk, then to come to her bedroom, or at least kiss her farewell.

The woman then stabs him to death. She throws his body in the river — sometimes with the help of one of the other women of the town, whom she bribes with a diamond ring — and is taunted by a bird. She tries to lure the bird down from the tree but it tells her that she will kill it if it comes within reach. When the search for Young Hunting starts, she either denies seeing him or claims that he left earlier, but when Hunting’s remains are found, in order to revoke her guilt, she reveals that she murdered him and is later burned at the stake. [sources: The GuardianWikipedia]

 

Nick Cave “Into My Arms”

I don’t believe in an interventionist God But I know, darling, that you do But if I did, I would kneel down and ask Him Not to intervene when it came to you Oh, not to touch a hair on your head Leave you as you are If he felt he had to direct you Then direct you into my arms Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms
And I don’t believe in the existence of angels But looking at you I wonder if that’s true But if I did I would summon them together And ask them to watch over you Both to each burn a candle for you To make bright and clear your path And to walk, like Christ, in grace and love And guide you into my arms Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms
But I believe in Love And I know that you do too And I believe in some kind of path That we can walk down, me and you So keep your candles burning Make her journey bright and pure That she’ll keep returning Always and evermore Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms