Watch it Again! Withnail and I (Bruce Robinson, 1987)

Pop reviews and in-depth analyses of current and classic films from around the world.

Living disillusioned in a post-Brexit Instagram-filtered age, standing at the periphery of the job market in a state of horror as the surplus of impressive graduates wander by, it is easy to feel alone. Marwood is the voice of reason when he reassures Withnail “we’re in the same boat”; we are all Withnail when he fires back “Stop saying that! You’re not in the same boat. The only thing you’re in that I’ve been in is this fucking bath!”

When Robinson wrote and directed this largely autobiographical low-budget film in 1987, he did not anticipate that the trials, tribulations, and hilarious mishaps of Withnail and “I” (played respectively by Richard E. Grant and Paul McGann) would leave such a legacy. A coming-of-age comedy based on two hapless drunken out-of-work actors struggling through the bleak aftermath of the swinging sixties, the film offers a nostalgic yet ultimately unappealing portrait of the 1960s bohemian lifestyle. Living in squalor so intense they feel “unusual” when they enter the kitchen, the eccentric self-deluding thespian Withnail and the slightly more low-key narrator “I” (Marwood in the screenplay) are both disenchanted with life.

The appeal of Withnail and I lies in its ability to reflect our flaws and fears whilst making them indisputably funny. In the documentary Withnail and Us, Robinson himself sums up the timelessness of Withnail and I as a movie that “touches the moment we’ve all had when we’re all broke, all starving, all aspiring, and all knowing that it might not work in our lives.” As a final-year student I rejoice in the bleak realistic portrayal of a kitchen filled with unidentifiable matter, an unwavering belief in the curative powers of alcohol, and the general unease of aimless direction. Marwood’s maudlin realisation that they “are indeed drifting into the arena of the unwell” in tandem with Withnail’s “I feel like a pig shat in my head” are sentiments embarrassingly yet undeniably relatable.

“I have some extremely distressing news. We’ve just run out of wine.”

Withnail’s first utterance in his iconic sophisticated slur sets the perfect tone for Bruce Robinson’s unbeatably British, ingenious tragicomedy Withnail and ILast year marked the film’s 30th anniversary, and like a fine wine, Withnail and I has improved with age.

When Robinson wrote and directed this largely autobiographical low-budget film in 1987, he did not anticipate that the trials, tribulations, and hilarious mishaps of Withnail and “I” (played respectively by Richard E. Grant and Paul McGann) would leave such a legacy. A coming-of-age comedy based on two hapless drunken out-of-work actors struggling through the bleak aftermath of the swinging sixties, the film offers a nostalgic yet ultimately unappealing portrait of the 1960s bohemian lifestyle. Living in squalor so intense they feel “unusual” when they enter the kitchen, the eccentric self-deluding thespian Withnail and the slightly more low-key narrator “I” (Marwood in the screenplay) are both disenchanted with life.

The appeal of Withnail and I lies in its ability to reflect our flaws and fears whilst making them indisputably funny. In the documentary Withnail and Us, Robinson himself sums up the timelessness of Withnail and I as a movie that “touches the moment we’ve all had when we’re all broke, all starving, all aspiring, and all knowing that it might not work in our lives.” As a final-year student I rejoice in the bleak realistic portrayal of a kitchen filled with unidentifiable matter, an unwavering belief in the curative powers of alcohol, and the general unease of aimless direction. Marwood’s maudlin realisation that they “are indeed drifting into the arena of the unwell” in tandem with Withnail’s “I feel like a pig shat in my head” are sentiments embarrassingly yet undeniably relatable.

Continue reading at BRIGHTLIGHTSFILM: Watch it Again! Withnail and I (Bruce Robinson, 1987) – Bright Lights Film Journal

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Saturday Kitchen cuts live phone-in over “Camberwall carrot” question

SATURDAY KITCHEN host Matt Tebbutt was forced to cut one caller off the show during a live phone-in resulted in the three guests chefs being asked a very inappropriate question.

During today’s edition of the popular BBC cooking show, one caller named Kylie phoned in for some advice.

Matt said: “We have Kylie from London, what’s your question?”

“Oh, hi Matt,” she replied.

“If I could ask the chefs what is the best herb to put with a Camberwell carrot?”

One guest chef asked: “Sorry, what was that?”

He continued to enquire: “What’s a Camberwell carrot?”

“I think we better move on from that one Kylie,” Matt insisted as he tried to stop himself from giggling.

Kylie’s line was then cut off as Matt tried to move the segment along.

“I’ll tell you what, let’s have some carrot recipes shall we?” he said.

“What would you do with carrots Sabrina?”

Sabrina went on to reveal she would roast carrots in the oven and add some harissa to add flavour. Continue reading

Jaguar F-Pace in the Lake District to visit locations from cult film ‘Withnail & I’

As I thunder north up the M6, I am fulfilling a mission 30 years in the making. I’m at the wheel of a Jaguar and the destination is Uncle Monty’s cottage. I am re-enacting Withnail & I. In this most quotable of cult films, Richard E Grant and Paul McGann arrived in Cumbria during a deluge in a Mk2 Jaguar, which had just one working headlight and a capricious windscreen wiper.

Our F-Pace is working perfectly and its bodywork is unblemished, yet the weather is similarly soaking. I had tracked down the owner of Crow Crag in the Lake District, our heroes’ refuge from the vicissitudes of London life, and secured an invitation [ .  . . ]

More at Source: THE TELEGRAPH Jaguar F-Pace in the Lake District to visit locations from cult film ‘Withnail & I’

Happy Birthday, Eighth Doctor Paul McGann!

Paul McGann

Happy birthday, Paul McGann! Born in Liverpool to a metallurgist and a teacher, McGann is one of five children—four of whom found their way into showbiz.

A member of the so-called “Brit Pack” (alongside big names like Tim Roth, Gary Oldman, and Colin Firth), the Liverpudlian actor turned his attention to television. It wasn’t until 1996, though, that McGann’s nerd credit was established. [ . . . ] More: Happy Birthday, Eighth Doctor Paul McGann! – Geek.com